Study: COVID-19 vaccine poses significant risks to children’s health


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(Natural News) Data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that individuals under the age of 18 have accounted for less than two percent of hospitalizations due to the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19).

The risk of severe illness or death from COVID-19 in healthy children is almost zero. With data collected for over 19 months, the risks clearly outweigh the benefits of getting COVID vaccination for younger children.

For most other viruses, young children are among the most vulnerable. It is not entirely surprising to immunologists as research revealed that children fare well against the virus due to their innate immune response – the body’s quick reaction to pathogens.

Health officials are aware that COVID poses little risk to children

The CDC, National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) all know of the data showing the little risk of COVID in children. They are at low risk of spreading the infection to other children and adults and they have little risk of taking the virus home with them.

Children are less at risk of developing severe illness and are far less susceptible to the virus, implying that any vaccination or clinical trials on children with a low risk of spreading illness and death are contraindicated, unethical and possibly harmful. (Related: Kids Pricked for Profit: The Financial Ties of Vaccine Promoters to Big Pharma.)

A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins University recently reported that after looking at a group of about 48,000 children in the U.S. who had been infected with the virus, they found no COVID-related deaths among the healthy kids. After studying comprehensive data, the team found a mortality rate of zero among children with no pre-existing medical condition.

A separate study suggests that children can also more easily neutralize the virus as their T-cells are relatively naive and can thus respond and optimally differentiate more rapidly, making a more robust response to novel viruses.

Children and adults in general display diverse immune responses to COVID-19 infections. There are far fewer cases or deaths in children because they have molecules that help mobilize immune system response during early infection. They also have cytokines that combat viral replication.

Vaccine ineffective at mitigating spread of virus

A separate study of 36 counties also showed that vaccinated individuals can still spread the virus, showing that current vaccines are not working well with the predominant delta variant and that there is no difference between the vaccinated and the unvaccinated in infecting, colonizing, carrying and transmitting the virus.

Based on shreds of evidence collected, the vaccines are seen to be ineffective against the delta variant, especially now that the delta variant is learning how to thrive against the vaccine.

A leading Israeli health official reported that vaccinated individuals account for 95 percent of severe cases, and 90 percent of new COVID-related hospitalizations. A similar situation is also emerging in the U.S., with new infections among the vaccinated reported.

With this in mind, there is generally no benefit to vaccinate children who are at a low risk of infection in the first place. Between their young age and their innate immunity, children should not get the vaccine.

Dr. Geert Vanden Bossche noted: “Children who get the disease mostly develop mild to moderate disease and as a result continue to contribute to herd immunity by developing broad and long-lived immunity.” The COVID-19 vaccine will only weaken the healthy immune systems of children.

Follow Pandemic.news for more news and information related to coronavirus vaccines.

Sources include:

WakingTimes.com

Nature.com

News.Yale.edu

MedRXIV.org


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