2020 Election fraud: USPS whistleblower explains he was interrogated by the FBI, which showed no interest in the election fraud itself


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(Natural News) On Tuesday, Dec. 1, a U.S. Postal Service (USPS) whistleblower named Jesse Morgan revealed that at least 280,000 ballots “disappeared” while he traveled from New York to Pennsylvania. Less than a week after, Morgan claimed that he was “interviewed” by federal agents but it felt more like an interrogation.

What happened to the ballots

On Dec. 1, Phill Kline, the director of the legal group Thomas More Society’s Amistad Project, revealed that at least 288,000 ballots for the 2020 U.S. election “disappeared” in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The ballots were delivered by truck from New York.

Amistad Project is a nonprofit focused on election integrity issues.

Kline, a former district attorney and Kansas attorney general, reported that he received evidence that around “130,000 to 280,000 completed ballots for the 2020 general election had been shipped from Bethpage, New York, before the ballots and the trailer in which they were shipped disappeared” on Oct. 21. He referenced statements from a USPS subcontractor that he called a whistleblower.

In a statement, Kline said Postal Service workers were engaged in “widespread illegal efforts” to manipulate election results. One whistleblower claimed that they transported thousands of prefilled ballots across state lines.

Once proven true, this would be considered a federal crime. Kline’s group also reported an “estimate” of the number of ballots that disappeared. Kline said that the group will share the information with law enforcement, including the FBI, U.S. attorneys in other areas, and local prosecutors who know about the evidence that his group has.

At the news conference, Morgan, a truck driver for a USPS subcontractor, said that he drove a truck with about 288,000 ballots on Oct. 21. But both the truck and the ballots disappeared from a USPS depot in Lancaster after he left it there.

Additionally, Morgan noticed that Postal Service personnel were behaving oddly and that they “grossly deviate[d] from normal procedure and behavior” on that day. He said that he was transporting completed mail-in ballots with addresses in Harrisburg.

However, he also had to deliver the ballots to Lancaster, a task he considered strange.

Ethan Pease from Madison, Wisconsin, another whistleblower, explained that he works as a USPS subcontractor. He mentioned that someone told him that the post office was “planning to backdate tens of thousands of mail-in ballots before the Nov. 3 election.”

Both Pease and Kline said that this was being done to bypass the submission deadline for ballots.

Interrogated, not interviewed

When Morgan appeared in “War Room: Pandemic,” he claimed that the FBI “interrogated” him under the guise of an interview, adding that agents and officials from one of the agency’s law enforcement arms talked to him to review his allegations earlier in December.

Morgan said he knows the agents were only doing their job, but he was puzzled since after giving them an account of his experience last October, the agents instead wanted to know how he appeared on TV. (Related: Fraud analyst: Counties that used Dominion machines shifted 2-3% of votes to Democrats.)

The Epoch Times reached out to both the FBI and the USPS for comment, but they didn’t immediately respond. Following the request, a spokesman for the USPS Office of Inspector General, one of the post office’s law enforcement arms, refused to comment.

Morgan also claimed that one of the agents kept mixing up his words or “didn’t understand” his answers. He added that while he spoke clearly, the agent found him “hard to comprehend.”

Instead of looking into the information he gave them, Morgan said the agents harassed his family. The feds also asked him about his family and how he arrived in Pennsylvania.

According to Morgan, it seemed like the authorities weren’t interested in investigating what happened to the trucks and ballots.

On Dec. 9, Morgan posted on Twitter to express his frustration about the experience.

Morgan has even gotten into arguments with his wife, who was worried about him coming forward to discuss the matter. She was also worried about Morgan losing his job because of what he did.

Morgan commented that he didn’t vote in the election because he was left with “two evils.”

In a video released by the Thomas More Society’s Amistad Project, Morgan shared that he believes in an honest election. He also thinks Americans “deserve an honest election.

Early in December, Morgan’s affidavit was submitted as part of an election lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania.

Money is being raised for both Morgan and Pease via a GoFundMe fundraiser. The organizer called both men serving Americans who are “by shedding light on the election fraud in the 2020 Presidential election, through sharing their personal experiences.”

Another USPS whistleblower has already spoken up before Morgan

Back in November, USPS letter carrier Richard Hopkins, another whistleblower in Pennsylvania, said he overheard supervisors talking about a plan to backdate mail-in ballots for Election Day. He also challenged reports that he recanted his fraud claims after an interview with USPS law enforcement agents.

Hopkins also released recordings of the interview with the agents. Marc Ruskin, a 27-year veteran of the FBI and former assistant district attorney in Brooklyn, New York, believes Hopkins was questioned because the agency was trying “to do damage control.”

Ruskin concluded that the whole interview was “pretty shocking behavior.”

Go to VoteFraud.news to read more articles with updates on election fraud in America.

Sources include:

TheEpochtimes.com 1

TheEpochTimes.com 2

Twitter.com

GoFundMe.com


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