Image: Diabetic? Regular exercise can reduce your risk of kidney disease

(Natural News) People with diabetes are at an increased risk of kidney disease. To reduce this risk, regular exercise is encouraged. A new study suggests that exercise, particularly aerobic exercise, could help cut the risk of kidney disease in diabetics.

Kidney disease, also known as renal disease, is a complication of diabetes. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases estimates that about 1 out of 4 adults with diabetes also suffer from kidney disease. Diabetic kidney disease develops slowly over many years, but you can prevent it or slow kidney damage by adhering to a healthy lifestyle.

In the study, a team of researchers from the U.S. carried out a study on rats to investigate the effect of exercise on kidney disease. The research team divided a combination of obese and lean rats into two groups: an active group and a sedentary group. Animals in the active group ran on a treadmill for 45 to 60 minutes every day for five days a week. On the other hand, the sedentary group only ran on a treadmill for 15 minutes twice a week.

Based on the results, the rats that exercised experienced improvements in their blood vessel health and kidney function. Obese rats, regardless of their group, experienced scarring on their kidney arteries, higher levels of protein in their urine, and fat deposits around the kidneys. However, all of those symptoms improved when they started exercising. The results also showed that the active rats experienced increases in their levels of calcium and copper in their bones compared to the sedentary group.

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The research team suggests that introducing an exercise program based in aerobic interval training is a good way to improve changes in kidney health and urinary parameters brought about by obesity and the development of diabetic kidney disease.

These findings, which were published in the American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology, indicate that regular exercise can help improve kidney function and prevent kidney disease in individuals with diabetes.

How diabetes harms the kidneys

The kidneys are mainly responsible for filtering wastes and extra water out of the blood to produce urine. These organs also help regulate blood pressure and produce hormones that are needed by the body to stay healthy. However, when they are damaged, they cannot properly filter blood, which can result in the building up of wastes in the body. Kidney damage can also lead to other health complications.

Having high levels of blood sugar and blood pressure increase the risk of kidney disease. High blood sugar levels can impair the blood vessels in the kidneys, which, in turn, can affect their proper functioning. Many people with diabetes also have high blood pressure, which can also harm the kidneys. Therefore, it is also important to control your blood sugar and blood pressure to lower your risk of kidney disease.

The risk of diabetic kidney disease can also be reduced by limiting your intake of high-fat foods and avoiding junk food and foods loaded with unhealthy carbs and starches. Health experts also encourage adhering to a diet that includes lean protein, such as chicken, fish, and lean cuts of meat; omega-3 fatty acids like oily fish; organic vegetables, including arugula, bell peppers, cabbage, onions, and radish; and plant sources of protein, such as beans, grains, and nuts.

People with diabetes are encouraged to take a blood and urine test to detect kidney damage. The tests are conducted to detect very small levels of a blood protein called albumin, which tells the first stages of kidney disease.

Read more news stories and studies on how to prevent diabetes complications naturally by going to DiabetesCure.news.

Sources include:

Diabetes.co.uk

NIDDK.NIH.gov


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