Home
Newsletter
Events
Blogs
Reports
Graphics
RSS
About Us
Contact Us
Write for Us
Media Info
Advertising Info
Mediterranean Diet

Ward off the middle-age bulge with the Mediterranean diet

Thursday, November 18, 2010 by: Anita Khalek
Tags: Mediterranean Diet, extra pounds, health news

Most Viewed Articles
https://www.naturalnews.com/030433_Mediterranean_Diet_extra_pounds.html
Delicious
diaspora
Print
Email
Share

(NewsTarget) Mediterranean diet followers have a better chance at warding off the extra pounds that are typically associated with aging, says a new study in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

It is expected that with age comes weight gain, but is there a way out of becoming overweight or obese? Lead researcher Juan-Jose Beunza of the University of Navarra and his team wanted to find the answer. The study, which was conducted in Spain, followed over 10,000 recruits for six years. Results were unequivocal; participants with the strictest adherence to the Mediterranean diet experienced the lowest weight gain with age, and the participants with the lowest adherence to the dietary pattern experienced the highest average yearly weight gain. The study also took into account other lifestyle habits like exercise and smoking, and once adjusted for those variables, results still held up accordingly. A hopeful Buenza explained: "The Mediterranean dietary pattern is a good user-friendly option to avoid falling into the obesity epidemic and all its unhealthy consequences."

Gaining a few pounds seems to be an expected part of the aging process for everyone. Why do we gain? The extra weight can be attributed to loss of muscle cells and infrequent exercise. As we age, repairing damaged muscles becomes more challenging for the body, and not nearly as fast of a job as it is for younger cells. This process becomes especially challenging for someone who is lacking proper nutrients delivered through that individual's food regimen. As we age, exercise also becomes more and more sporadic. This lack of movement promotes weight gain especially for someone whose caloric intake remains high and low in nutrient density.

The Mediterranean diet is rich in healthy fats mainly from olive oil, fish, beans, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits. Countless studies all agree to the extensive health benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet, including lowering the risks of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer among many others. And most agree that the synergy between all these nutrients leads to cumulative effects on the body. "The more we study it, the more we learn about its benefits on health", Buenza concludes.



Sources:

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajc...

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6A34V4...

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php...



About the author

Anita Khalek resides in North Carolina. As a total wellness advocate, she is a passionate believer in the healing power of Nature and is inspired by local, organic and fresh foods to nurture her family and friends. Anita is currently working on several projects including a cookbook. Visit her blog for fresh, healthy recipes at myFreshLevant.com.
Questions and suggestions can be directed to [email protected]



Receive Our Free Email Newsletter

Get independent news alerts on natural cures, food lab tests, cannabis medicine, science, robotics, drones, privacy and more.


comments powered by Disqus


Natural News Wire (Sponsored Content)

Science.News
Science News & Studies
Medicine.News
Medicine News and Information
Food.News
Food News & Studies
Health.News
Health News & Studies
Herbs.News
Herbs News & Information
Pollution.News
Pollution News & Studies
Cancer.News
Cancer News & Studies
Climate.News
Climate News & Studies
Survival.News
Survival News & Information
Gear.News
Gear News & Information
Glitch.News
News covering technology, stocks, hackers, and more