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Obesity

Eat Slowly and Help Prevent Obesity

Monday, March 08, 2010 by: Anthony Gucciardi
Tags: obesity, eating, health news

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(NewsTarget) Eating slowly has been advocated by a multitude of health experts for many years. It has been known for quite some time that eating slowly leads to a better digestive system, but what about its ability to help cut caloric intake? According to research done by the Athens University Medical School and The Journal of the American Dietetic Association, eating slowly can actually help you cut calories.

The studies shed new light on how the pace at which people eat is a factor in weight fluctuation. In one study, scientists served an identical dish of ice cream to a group of subjects. The group that consumed the ice cream in 30 minutes released more hormones that made them feel full. The other group ate the ice cream in 5 minutes and was found to release less of these key hormones.

The scientists also took blood samples of the subjects and measured their hormonal levels as well as their insulin levels. The blood tests were conducted before, during, and after eating. With the group that ate much more slowly, an increase in glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY was found. These two hormones signal the feeling of fullness.

The study from The Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that when eating slower, the subjects consumed roughly 10 percent fewer calories than those who ate quickly. Since a more profound hormonal response is triggered when eating slowly, it gives a strong feeling of fullness. When eating quickly, the hormonal response is much less intense. This means that you may still feel hungry after eating the same amount of food at a quicker pace.

The British Medical Journal also found a link between eating quickly and negative health effects. In a study of 3,000 subjects, those who reported eating quickly and until full were found to have triple the risk of being overweight as compared to those who ate slowly. This means that eating too quickly could actually be a factor in weight gain.

With so many American's struggling to even fit lunch in their schedule, it is no wonder so many people are eating their meals so hastily. It is understandable that there is simply not enough time in the day for many working citizens to sit down and enjoy a meal to its fullest. While it may prove to be quite a challenge, it is clear that it pays to eat your meals slowly. These studies show that eating a meal over the course of 30 minutes seems to provide a sufficient hormonal reaction, and therefore prevent excessive eating.

Sources:
http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abs...
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18589027
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18940848
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/23/health/23r...

About the author

Anthony Gucciardi is a health activist and wellness researcher, whose goal is centered around educating the general public as to how they may obtain optimum health. He has authored countless articles highlighting the benefits of natural health, as well as exposing the pharmaceutical industry. Anthony is the creator of Natural Society (http://www.NaturalSociety.com), a natural health website. Anthony has been accurately interpreting national and international events for years within his numerous political articles. Anthony's articles have been seen by millions around the world, and hosted on multiple top news websites.


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