Home
Subscribe (free)
About NaturalNews
Contact Us
Write for NaturalNews
Media Info
Advertising Info
The page you're viewing now, as well as 140,000+ other pages from Natural News, have all been CENSORED by Google due to a "human decision" to silence this entire website. Google's abuse of monopoly power to suppress human knowledge must be stopped.
SIGN THIS WHITE HOUSE PETITION NOW (now 55K! and rising) and demand an investigation into Google's discriminatory censorship.

Google refuses to provide any evidence to justify blacklisting Natural News

How Google LIED | PROOF: HuffPo, BuzzFeed, Forbes, CNN violations ignored by Google

Asthma

Antibiotics use dramatically raises risk of asthma in infants; pet dogs cut risk by 50 percent

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer
Tags: asthma, antibiotics, health news

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
http://www.naturalnews.com/022239_asthma_antibiotics.html
Delicious
diaspora
Print
Email
Share
(NewsTarget) Using antibiotics in the first year of life may significantly increase a child's risk of contracting asthma by age 7, according to a study conducted by researchers at University of Manitoba and McGill University in Montreal and published in "CHEST," the journal of the American College of Chest Physicians.

The researchers examined a prescription database that included information on 13,116 children and compared incidence of asthma with a variety of risk factors, including antibiotic use, gender, maternal asthma history, living location, neighborhood income, the presence of pets in the home and the number of siblings at the age of seven.

The study concluded that those who had received antibiotics for the treatment of a non-respiratory tract infection in their first year were twice as likely to suffer from asthma at the age of seven than those who had not. The higher the number of treatments, the higher the child's risk of asthma.

Eighty-seven percent of children who had received antibiotics were treated for respiratory tract infections. Because respiratory tract infections early in life may be a sign of developing asthma, however, the researchers excluded these cases from the sample in order to be sure the effect they were observing was related only to the antibiotics.

The researchers also found that maternal history of asthma significantly increased a child's risk of the disease. The presence of the dog in the house during the first year of life, however, led to a reduced risk of contracting asthma. Among children who received multiple treatments with antibiotics, those with the dog in the house suffered half the asthma risk of those without.

"Dogs bring germs into the home, and it is thought that this exposure is required for the infant's immune system to develop normally. Other research has shown that the presence of a dog in early life protects against the development of asthma," said lead researcher Anita Kozyrskyj.
Join the Health Ranger's FREE email newsletter
Get breaking news alerts on GMOs, fluoride, superfoods, natural cures and more...
Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time. | Learn more...
comments powered by Disqus