Instead of diet and exercise, the establishment wants obese children to take drugs and undergo invasive surgeries



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(Natural News) The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued new guidelines urging parents of obese children to treat them “early and aggressively” with pharmaceutical drugs and invasive surgeries.

Changing a fat child’s diet and exercise routine is secondary to drugging and putting them under the knife for rapid weight loss, the AAP now says.

“Waiting doesn’t work,” says Dr. Ihuoma Eneli, one of the co-authors of the new guidance, which is the first to be released by the AAP in 15 years. “What we see is a continuation of weight gain and the likelihood that they’ll have (obesity) in adulthood.”

According to the AAP, children as young as 12 should be fed pharmaceutical drugs for weight loss. And children as young as 13, the group says, should be made eligible for fat-reduction surgeries.

Sure, eating healthy and moving one’s body is important – but not necessarily as important as consuming more drugs and getting more surgeries, Eneli suggested.

“In general, doctors should offer adolescents 12 and older who have obesity access to appropriate drugs and teens 13 and older with severe obesity referrals for weight-loss surgery, though situations may vary,” reported The Associated Press (AP). (Related: Women who take antioxidants before and during pregnancy reduce the risk of their children becoming obese.)

Obesity isn’t “a personal problem,” the AAP insists – it’s just how some children are!

To suggest that children are obese because of bad eating habits and lack of physical activity is a misnomer, according to Dr. Sandra Hassink, medical director for the AAP Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, and fellow guidelines co-author.

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In Hassink’s view, obesity is just a unique characteristic that some children inherently possess that is not “a personal problem,” nor does it involve any type of “failure of the person’s diligence.”

“This is not different than you have asthma and now we have an inhaler for you,” she said.

This “body positivity” message is great news for Big Pharma and the medical-industrial complex, which by normalizing fatness will maintain a steady stream of new customers who, rather than change their diet and lifestyle, will forever be hooked on pills and body mutilation.

“Obesity is not a lifestyle problem,” added Aaron Kelly, co-director of the Center for Pediatric Obesity Medicine at the University of Minnesota. “It is not a lifestyle disease. It predominantly emerges from biological factors.”

And there you have it: the normalization of obesity as something a person is born with rather than something stemming from unhealthy eating and living. Again, this is great news for the pharmaceutical industry, which just recently gained approval for a new anti-obesity weekly injection called Wegovy that is available for children as young as 12.

For just $1,300 a month, a child can receive these injections, which are not covered by most insurance companies – meaning parents will have to pay out of pocket for it.

Social media “influencers” are also now peddling these drugs to impressionable children, many of whom are fat and depressed – hence why many of them live on social media in the first place.

Platforms like TikTok are the new “cable news” networks for the younger generations that no longer watch television. Instead of pharmaceutical commercials bookending news segments as has long been the case, influencers on TikTok are marketing drugs – including transgender mutilation drugs – directly to the children who follow them.

“I definitely think this is a realization that diet and exercise is not going to do it for a number of teens who are struggling with this – maybe the majority,” said Dr. Stephanie Byrne, a pediatrician at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, about this new drug and surgery paradigm for childhood fatness.

You can learn more about how to avoid or fight obesity at FightObesity.news.

Sources for this article include:

APNews.com

NaturalNews.com


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