Supply chain crunch still affecting automobile industry as Ford’s trademark blue oval badges, nameplates run out



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(Natural News) Ford Motor Co. recently had late deliveries of F-Series pickups due to the shortage of blue oval badges that can be found at the front of almost every vehicle it makes. The Wall Street Journal reported that the Detroit automaker has also run into supply constraints with the nameplates that specify the car model.

The car manufacturer first reported the issue on September 23. The incident marked the latest in the myriad of supply chain issues that Ford and other auto manufacturers worldwide have experienced since the onset of the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Tribar Technologies, the firm that makes the badges for Ford, has been forced to limit its operations beginning in August. The firm reportedly disclosed to state regulators that it had “discharged industrial chemicals into a local sewer system.”

Just recently, Ford reported $1 billion extra costs in Q3 as a result of “inflation and supply chain issues.”

The firm has been suffering from a shortage of semiconductor chips for well over a year. The parts shortages have affected roughly 40,000 to 45,000 vehicles, primarily high-margin trucks and SUVs.

In another report, Ford announced plans to restructure its global supply chain to “support efficient and reliable sourcing of components, internal development of key technologies and capabilities and world-class cost and quality execution.”

Ford running into trouble recently

Ford has also recalled 1,175 units of its 2022 Mustang Mach-E electric vehicle (EV) due to a manufacturing defect. According to the company, concerns arose that the right-rear axle half shafts were not reliable enough and could break. (Related: Ford recalls electric version of iconic Mustang muscle car, citing manufacturing defect.)

Brighteon.TV

“When your axle fails, it is possible that you’ll lose control of the car, possibly causing an accident,” the website Your Mechanic warned.

The dealers will inspect the Mach-E models that were produced between July 18 and July 29 at the Cuautitlan assembly plant in Mexico. They will replace right-rear half shafts as necessary.

As per Car and Driver, the base price of a Mustang Mach-E when the 2022 model was unveiled was $43,995 and the first units of the said model were delivered in February.

This is not the first time the automakers recalled Mach-E due to manufacturing defects. Back in June, Ford recalled some 2021-2022 vehicles because the high-voltage battery main contactors may overheat.

Moreover, the all-wheel drive version of the car was also pulled out from the market in May. Its powertrain control module safety software was seen to fail to detect some software errors that could lead to unintended acceleration or deceleration.

In 2021, the models were also called back because the car windshields could detach. During the same year, another recall was issued as the front subframe bolts may not have been tightened properly during assembly.

Meanwhile, other electric car manufacturers have also recalled EVs over safety concerns.

Tesla is recalling nearly 1.1 million EVs because the window automatic reversal system may not react correctly after detecting an obstruction, increasing the risk of injury.

Earlier in September, Rivian also issued a recall for 207 R1T and R1S EVs whose seat belt adjuster bolt for the driver and front passenger may come loose in the event of an accident. This means the belts would not be able to do their job of restraining occupants.

Lucid also recalled their luxury EV Air back in May due to potential issues stemming from the car’s wiring harness.

Visit SupplyChainWarning.com for more news related to the supply shortage brought about by inflation.

Watch the below video that talks about the supply chain being sabotaged.

This video is from the Free4eva Media channel on Brighteon.com.

More related stories:

US burdened by tire shortage as global supply chain crisis continues.

Report warns that supply chain backlogs might never let up.

Russia-Ukraine conflict not helping American companies with their supply chain problems.

Stocks of shipping companies plummet as supply chain crisis worsens.

Sources include:

ZeroHedge.com

WSJ.com

DetroitNews.com

WesternJournal.com

YourMechanic.com

Reuters.com

InsideEVs.com

TechCrunch.com

Brighteon.com


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