CDC: Most people getting sick “from coronavirus” are overweight or obese


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(Natural News) New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reveals that the vast majority of Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) patients who require hospitalization or who die are either overweight or obese.

A whopping 78 percent of people who require a ventilator or who pass away after testing “positive” for the Chinese virus are simply too large for their own good. This suggests that poor eating habits and bad lifestyle choices, rather than other people’s refusal to wear a mask or social distance, are the true culprits behind the plandemic.

According to the latest CDC data from 2018, nearly half of the American population is now considered to be obese, meaning a person has a body mass index (BMI) score of 30 or more. Overweight people, who are slightly less fat than obese people, have a BMI of between 25 and 30.

Among the 148,494 adults in America who received a Wuhan flu diagnosis during an emergency room or inpatient visit at one of 238 hospitals analyzed between March and December of last year, 71,491 of these individuals had to be hospitalized. More than half of them were determined to be morbidly obese, while another nearly 30 percent were overweight.

Only a very small percentage of healthy-weight people develop complications after testing positive for Chinese germs, on the other hand. According to the CDC, people with a BMI under 25 rarely need to be hospitalized or admitted to an ICU for Chinese virus complications. Even fewer die after testing positive.

“As clinicians develop care plans for COVID-19 patients, they should consider the risk for severe outcomes in patients with higher BMIs, especially for those with severe obesity,” the CDC warns.

The latest news about the Chinese virus can be found at Pandemic.news.

Black Americans are the fattest demographic, says the CDC

What this all means, of course, is that being fat is directly linked to also becoming seriously ill or dying from the Wuhan flu. No amount of trying to force others to wear a mask or social distance will help a fat person survive in the event that he or she develops an infection, in other words.

These statements may not be politically correct, but they are the truth. The CDC’s own data clearly shows that fat people are the ones developing serious complications after receiving an affirmative nose javelin diagnosis, which is on them and nobody else.

Because of this, the CDC is now quietly emphasizing the importance of good nutrition and regular physical activity as deterrents against developing COVID-19 complications. The thinner and healthier a person is, the less likely he or she is to get sick or die – period.

As it turns out, non-Hispanic black people are the fattest demographic in America, according to the CDC, followed by Hispanic adults. Trailing them are non-Hispanic white people, the agency says.

It is also important to note that being obese means that one’s immune system is critically suppressed, making that person more susceptible to infection. Fat people also have decreased lung capacity, which inhibits their ability to properly ventilate oxygen in the same way as thinner people.

The plus-size community had better start moving and eating better if its members want to live, in other words. Developing an obesity-related illness such as a COVID-19 infection would seem to be the sole fault of the obese, having nothing to do with a fat person’s neighbor who refuses to wear a mask or stay home.

Last April, research from French professor Jean-François Delfraissy found the same thing: Unhealthy fat people are the ones getting sick and requiring specialized care due to the Chinese virus – not healthy thin people.

Sources for this article include:

CNBC.com

NaturalNews.com


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