Michigan lawsuit alleges poll workers knowingly supported election fraud by allowing flawed mail-in ballots to be counted


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(Natural News) The Great Lakes Justice Center has filed a new election fraud lawsuit in the state that alleged that poll workers were told by supervisors to backdate ballots and not bother with verifying signatures on absentee or mail-in ballots. The lawsuit also alleged that “non-eligible” absentee ballots were still being accepted and counted.

The Michigan-based law firm filed a 78-page lawsuit on behalf of plaintiffs Edward McCall and Cheryl Costantino. While the Michigan court deliberates on the case, they have demanded that a temporary restraining order be placed on the ongoing counting of ballots in Wayne County and, specifically, the Democratic-leaning city of Detroit. (Related: “Glitch” in Michigan county gives Biden an extra 6,000 votes – similar anomalies found in 47 other counties.)

“The main concern is, obviously, the clear fraud that occurred in the counting process of the votes in Wayne County, and the way votes were manufactured by workers that were there,” said David Kallman, senior counsel with the Great Lakes Justice Center, during an interview with The Epoch Times.

The plaintiffs are asking the court to void the election in Wayne County and to order a new vote.

“The court has a lot of options, but if they think the fraud is bad enough, the court could void the election and order a new election,” said Kallman.

Election worker swears that she witnessed election fraud

At least two people, a Detroit election worker and a poll watcher for the Republican Party have signed affidavits swearing that they witnessed potential voter fraud and suspicious conduct during the processing of ballots in Detroit.

Detroit election worker Jessy Jacob said she was instructed by her superiors to backdate mail-in ballots that were received after the cut-off date and to ignore any deficiencies found in them.

According to her affidavit, Jacob worked at the county’s election headquarters in September along with 70 to 80 other poll workers. She helped process absentee ballot packages to be sent out to voters.

During her time working there, Jacob was allegedly told by her supervisors to adjust the mailing date on the absentee ballot packages so that they were dated earlier than they were actually sent. The supervisor apparently announced that all of the poll workers should engage in the backdating.

“I directly observed, on a daily basis, City of Detroit election workers and employees coaching and trying to coach voters to vote for Joe Biden and the Democratic Party,” she said in her sworn affidavit. “I witnessed these workers and employees encouraging voters to do a straight Democratic ballot. I witnessed these election workers and employees going over to the voting booths with voters in order to watch them vote and coach them for whom to vote.”

She further claimed that she was told not to ask for any kind of identification from first-time voters who arrived at a polling center to vote in-person. Pennsylvania law states that people voting for the first time must show proof of identification.

Poll challenger witnessed election workers accepting ballots from “non-eligible” voters

Several poll challengers also signed affidavits attesting to alleged election fraud. One of these is attorney Zachary Larsen, the former assistant attorney general of Michigan. He worked as a poll watcher for the Republican Party during the ballot counting, and he alleges that election workers in Detroit processed a “majority” of mail-in ballots received from non-eligible voters.

These mail-in ballots were also not listed in the poll book of eligible voters and nor were they found on Larsen’s own scanned list.

In the affidavit, Larsen stated that when he tried to move to a different position to get a better look at the poll book on the computer screen, he was “loudly and aggressively” told by election workers for not standing at least six feet away from election officials.

Larsen protested this, saying that he was unable to verify the eligibility of the voters who sent mail-in ballots, but this objection was turned down, and the former assistant attorney general was told to stand in an area where the computer screen was not in his view.

This violates election procedures, because Larsen, being an officially designated poll challenger, was allowed to observe from “an equivalent distance from poll books.”

Larsen also states that he saw at least two election officials “adjusting” the secrecy sleeves on mail-in ballots to peek into them.

Larsen conferred with another poll challenger, who said that they saw similar election violations. This challenger raised objections with an election supervisor, but was told “What difference does it make?” and “Why does it matter?”

The former prosecutor also raised a concern with a supervisor when he witnessed ballots being put aside as “problem ballots” because they did not come with secrecy sleeves, and yet similarly problematic ballots were being processed normally. The election supervisor did not directly answer Larsen’s concerns, simply saying that they were put into the problem ballots box “for efficiency.”

At around noon, Larsen left the ballot counting room to fill out a challenge, speak with a colleague and take his lunch break. After he left, no other poll challengers were allowed to enter the counting room.

“Election officials never allowed Mr. Larsen to re-enter the counting room to fulfill his duties as a poll challenger after he had discovered the fraud which was taking place,” read the affidavit.

Read up on the latest serious allegations of voter fraud in Michigan and other battleground states like Pennsylvania, Nevada and Arizona at VoteFraud.news.

Sources include:

TheEpochTimes.com

LawOfficer.com

VotesPA.com

TheFederalist.com


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