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Image: Melania Trump used “vitamins and healthy food” to cure coronavirus

(Natural News) Instead of downing a pharmaceutical cocktail of remdesivir, the steroid dexamethasone, and an experimental antibody regimen made from Regeneron like her husband did, First Lady Melania Trump decided to take “a more natural route” in treating her Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) positive test result with vitamins and healthy food.

Though she did not specify any further which vitamins or foods she relied on, Melania announced that her nutrition-based approach, combined with focusing her mind on her family, friendships and work, was highly effective at naturally ridding her body of symptoms that included a cough, body aches and fatigue.

“I encourage everyone to continue to live the healthiest life they can,” Melania wrote in an official White House announcement. “A balanced diet, fresh air, and vitamins really are vital to keep our bodies healthy.”

“For your complete well-being, compassion and humility are just as important in keeping our minds strong,” the first lady added. “For me personally, the most impactful part of my recovery was the opportunity to reflect on many things – family, friendships, my work, and staying true to who you are.”

Just a few short days after starting this regimen, Melania was essentially cured of the coronavirus, demonstrating the power of nutrition in supporting a healthy immune system – even against “novel” viruses that supposedly have no cure.

“If you are sick, or if you have a loved one who is sick – I am thinking of you and will be thinking of you every day,” Melania went on to write. “I pray for our country and I pray for everyone who is grappling with COVID-19 or any other illnesses or challenges.”

Mainstream media throws fit, says “no evidence” healthy living protects against COVID-19

In response to Melania’s announcement, the mainstream media reacted harshly by declaring that food “can’t cure or prevent COVID-19.” Business Insider, for instance, announced that “there’s no evidence that diet alone can stave off the illness or help to treat it if you do get sick.”

The first lady’s anecdotal evidence, in other words, counts for nothing, and Americans should simply continue to live in fear and hopelessness, according to Business Insider.

While clinical trials of intravenous vitamin C found that the citrus nutrient can, in fact, treat the coronavirus, Dr. Caroline Apovian, cited by Business Insider, says this is fake news.

“If you’re in contact with coronavirus, it doesn’t matter how many oranges you eat – you’re going to get it,” Dr. Apovian, who directs the Nutrition and Weight Management Program at Boston Medical Center, insists, further ignoring related research showing that vitamin C plus quercetin is another solid remedial approach to quelling the novel virus.

Vitamin D, on the other hand, could be beneficial in treating the coronavirus, according to Business Insider – but only because Anthony Fauci of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) stated back in September that it might work.

Zinc is likewise linked to positive coronavirus outcomes, along with hydroxychloroquine, the generic anti-malaria drug that has been widely maligned by the medical deep state because it is off-patent and easily procured – meaning no windfall profits for Big Pharma.

Exercise is further beneficial at keeping any illness at bay, helping to rev up the body and detoxify it through sweat and movement. While Business Insider suggests doing it outside away from other people, those with an aversion to perpetual isolation are free to, how and with whom they see fit, in alignment with their own personal health needs.

More related news about the coronavirus can be found at Pandemic.news.

Sources for this article include:

BusinessInsider.com

WhiteHouse.gov

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com


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