Nearly 50,000 Ohio voters received incorrect absentee ballots


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(Natural News) A total of 49,669 voters in Franklin County, Ohio were mailed incorrect absentee ballots, according to the county’s own board of elections. In a statement, the board pledged to contact all affected voters and mail them replacement ballots. In addition, they will provide information postcards of the incident and give them alternative means of voting, including early in-person voting.

The corrected ballots have already been printed, and the U.S. Postal Service is set to mail them by Oct. 12. The board also made clear that stringent tracking measures are in place for each resident to only cast one vote.

The mishap was caused by a malfunction in the scanning devices for the ballots. According to the board, an employee changed the setting on one of the scanners, causing it to stop working. In response, the election board asked law enforcement not to intervene, as the incident was unintentional. However, the board is still investigating the company that sold them the scanners.

President Donald Trump, who has been skeptical of absentee and mail-in voting since the very beginning of his campaign, has already spoken about the incident. In a tweet posted on Friday, he said: “Breaking news: 50,000 Ohio voters getting wrong absentee ballots. Out of control. A rigged election!”

Incidents involving absentee ballots rampant across the country

Unfortunately, the “accident” in Franklin County is not the only instance wherein incidents occurred with absentee or mail-in ballots. (Related: Criminal Colorado secretary of state urging non-citizens and dead people to register to vote so she can help steal the state for Democrats.)

In Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, authorities discovered several mail-in ballots that voted for Trump had been discarded. These ballots were mailed in by members of the military. In Outagamie County, Wisconsin, trays filled with mail were discovered abandoned in a ditch near the county’s airport. The postal service later announced that there were several absentee ballots included in the abandoned mail, although they refused to divulge how many. An investigation is ongoing.

In the Woodland Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles County, nearly 2,100 voters received “faulty ballots” that did not have a page where they could vote for president. Instead, the absentee ballot printed the page where people could vote on state propositions twice.

Nicholas Beauchene, 26, a mail carrier for the USPS, was arrested for throwing away at least 99 absentee ballots intended for the county’s voters. The ballots, along with the other mail he discarded, were found in dumpsters around the county. He has been charged with one count of obstruction of mail and one count of delay, secretion or detention of mail.

The number of people who are expected to vote by mail this election is unprecedented. What’s worse, however, is the fact that absentee ballot rejections are also expected to reach historic levels. According to investigations conducted by reporters, it is estimated that, if half of the nation’s electorate votes by mail, at least 1.03 million of those absentee ballots will be rejected.

This is the best-case scenario. If 75 percent of the country votes by mail, the number of discarded ballots jumps to 1.55 million. In this scenario, that means over 185,000 votes could be lost in key swing states like Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Florida.

Learn more about the many incidents surrounding voting by mail, as well as the dangers that come with absentee or mail-in voting by reading the latest articles at VoteFraud.news.

Sources include:

TheEpochTimes.com

Twitter.com 1

ABC6OnYourSide.com

Radio.WOSU.org

Fox61.com

TheEpochTimes.com

Fox11Online.com

Breitbart.com

NBCNewYork.com

USAToday.com


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