Minnesota doctor decries censorship, says he is under investigation for COVID-19 opinions


Image: Minnesota doctor decries censorship, says he is under investigation for COVID-19 opinions

(Natural News) Minnesota doctor and Republican state senator Scott Jensen is now under investigation by medical authorities for voicing out his opinions about the SARS-COV2 virus, as well as the guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on certifying COVID-19 deaths.

Jensen, who is a family physician by profession, took to social media to share that the Board of Medical Practice in Minnesota is currently investigating him for allegedly “spreading misinformation” regarding the completion of death certificates during his appearance on a news program. The so-called investigation also includes him allegedly providing what was deemed to be “reckless advice,” in which he allegedly compared COVID-19 to influenza.

“I should have seen it coming because I saw the threats on social media; I’ve seen them for the last two or three months. They didn’t agree with me. They didn’t like that I was trying to provide some context for the flu, for COVID-19,” Jensen said in a video. (Related: Expert: Actual COVID-19 deaths likely to be double the “official” numbers.)

While he has no means to identify who sent or made the complaints, he is sure that the threats came from “people in all walks of life” – including fellow physicians.

“I don’t know if they’re routinely in a political camp if they’re activists. I’ve gone online and looked at what it takes to complete a complaint that the Board of Medical Practice has to follow up on,” Jensen said. “It’s a one-page deal. You can say what you want, you could be a huge donor for the other party.”

Jensen, in an interview with KARE, noted that his situation is currently hard, especially since the licensing board is being used as a weapon.

“And then the fact that you don’t get to know your accuser. And this has nothing to do with patient care, this has to do with public comments,” he added, referring to a clause that prohibits the medical board from divulging the names of those who lodged the complaints against him.

“This is a conversation that, quite frankly, Minnesota and America have to have,” Jensen said in his KARE interview, adding that using a regulatory board to silence a person for his opinions is wrong.

One of the complaints lodged against him stems from an interview he did back in April, wherein he cited the instructions that physicians received from the Minnesota Department of Health on how to label probable COVID-19 deaths on patient death certificates.

In that interview, Jensen took particular issue with listing COVID-19 on death certificates, noting that following government instruction ?– which mandated that suspected cases be labeled as actual COVID-19 deaths – would only result in the artificial inflation of the number of deaths because fatalities from other illnesses could be lumped together with those caused by the coronavirus without undergoing actual laboratory confirmation.

The interview prompted the Minnesota Department of Health to clarify what the instructions meant, with the department assuring the public that probable COVID-19 cases will not be added to the state’s official death totals until after their confirmation. This was then confirmed by Jensen, who noted that while Minnesota is doing the death count correctly, places such as New York and other states are still overstating their actual death tolls.

Aside from his comments on the labeling of COVID-19 casualties, Jensen also faces a complaint regarding his public statements wherein he compared the mortalities caused by the COVID-19 pandemic to those caused by other factors.

“When we talk in our country of 130,000 deaths of COVID-19 and then I share with you between suicides, drug overdoses and accidents the deaths are twice that number, I think that matters,” the state senator added.

Jensen has also come under fire for his criticism of the CDC, saying in a Fox News interview that the nation’s top epidemiological agency not only mishandled the pandemic but also became a partisan organization. While he still thinks that the Board of Medical Practice does “important work” and that he has plans to “fully cooperate with them,” he still feels as though he is being targeted for his opinions.

“If this could happen to me because of my views, it could happen to anybody.”

Sources include:

TheEpochTimes.com

Fox9.com

KARE11.com

MSN.com


Receive Our Free Email Newsletter

Get independent news alerts on natural cures, food lab tests, cannabis medicine, science, robotics, drones, privacy and more.


Disqus