Bill Nye the fake science guy LIES to his audience, falsely claims vaccines contain no ingredients other than viral fragments


Image: Bill Nye the fake science guy LIES to his audience, falsely claims vaccines contain no ingredients other than viral fragments

(Natural News) Facebook has launched a new “Fact-Checker” feature that it says will identify misinformation about vaccines in users’ posts. But the spy tool is already getting it wrong by confirming as true false claims made by Bill Nye “The Science Guy” that vaccines only contain viral and/or bacterial antigens.

The way it actually happened is that Facebook’s Fact-Checker targeted a video clip recently put up by Del Bigtree of The Highwire that correctly links toxic ingredients in the MMR vaccine for measles, mumps, and rubella to encephalopathy. According to Facebook, all vaccines are safe, and neither the MMR nor any other vaccine causes encephalopathy or associated toxicity.

Bigtree’s video, which was originally published on May 4, 2017, is a direct response to false claims made by Nye that all vaccines are safe and effective, and only contain viral and bacterial fragments designed to produce immunity. A simple look at vaccine package inserts confirms this to be false, of course, and Bigtree accurately pointed this out in his video.

But in the eyes of Facebook, vaccines somehow do not contain deadly additives such as aluminum and formaldehyde, even though these additives are plainly stated on the manufacturer labels. And if you try to point these labels out on Facebook, you might have your post classified by the Fact-Checker as “misinformation.”

Even encephalopathy is listed in vaccine package inserts as a possible side effect of vaccination, as shown during clinical trials. This inflammatory condition of the brain is rather common in young children who receive the MMR vaccine in particular, and the MMR vaccine’s package insert confirms this.

Even so, Facebook apparently does not agree with the information contained in vaccine package inserts, and says that it is all “false.” And for daring to reiterate what these package inserts state, Bigtree also had his video labeled as “false” by Facebook.

“Contrary to popular video claim, vaccine ingredients are safe, not linked to encephalopathy,” reads the headline of an article by Health Feedback that Facebook linked to over the top of the Bigtree video in question.

To get up to speed on the vaccine debate, be sure to check out the following episode of The Health Ranger Report in which Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, offers a few pointers as to what you should know:

Yes, Facebook, encephalopathy is causally related to the MMR vaccine

According to Facebook, encephalopathy is not a causal condition associated with the MMR vaccine, meaning it suddenly appears at random following vaccination without having anything to do with the vaccine itself.

Because the package insert for MMR lists encephalopathy as occurring “without regard to causality,” it is “therefore erroneous to assert a causal relationship between vaccines and encephalopathy on the basis of the package insert information.”

What Facebook is ignoring, however, is the fact that the courts have confirmed that encephalopathy is causally related to the MMR vaccine, meaning this jab can and does cause encephalopathy. To claim otherwise, in other words, is completely disingenuous and flat-out false.

But would we expect anything less from Facebook? After all, this is the same Big Tech platform that is now denying that toxic metals are added to childhood vaccines, which is an undeniable fact. Facebook also denies the fact that childhood vaccines have never been safety tested against actual inert placebos.

Facebook also denies the reality that injecting aluminum into babies, even at “low” levels that are said to be “safe,” has never been properly safety tested. The government’s declaration that the aluminum contained in vaccines represents a “minimal risk level” comes from a single study that was performed on rodents, not actual humans.

For more related news about vaccines, visit Vaccines.news.

Sources for this article include:

JeremyRHammond.com

NaturalNews.com


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