Human Rights Commission says “it’s okay to be white” message has “no place” in New Zealand


Image: Human Rights Commission says “it’s okay to be white” message has “no place” in New Zealand

(Natural News) The New Zealand Human Rights Commission says that the message “it’s okay to be white” has “no place” in the country.

(Article by Paul Joseph Watson republished from InfoWars.com)

The ‘controversy’ began when “it’s okay to be white” t-shirts and stickers were sold on a New Zealand auction site called Trade Me.

“Wear this shirt as a white person to troll your local Communists, or wear this shirt as a brown person to troll stuck-up middle-class urbanites. Either way it’s funny!” read the description to the products.

The Human Rights Commission said they don’t see the funny side and that the message “it’s okay to be white” has “no place” in New Zealand because it conveys “a message of intolerance, racism and division”.

To its credit, the Trade Me website refused to pull the items, saying the slogan didn’t break its rules.

“While we know there is some debate about this slogan we don’t think these items cross that line,” said head of trust and safety, George Hiotakis.

However, Hiotakis said that the items may be removed if they receive enough complaints, once again empowering hysterical leftist hate mobs.

The “it’s okay to be white meme” was a troll started by 4chan in 2017 as a way to trigger leftists into revealing their own anti-white bigotry.

Since then it has appeared on signs which have been posted in major western cities on numerous occasions.

Still, it could be worse, the t-shirts could have an ‘OK’ hand sign on them as well.

As we previously highlighted, in the aftermath of the Christchurch mosque massacre police in New Zealand are paying visits to conservatives’ homes to interrogate them about their political opinions.

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Read more at: InfoWars.com or IdentityPolitics.news.


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