Gluten intolerance may not exist at all says surprising new study


Image: Gluten intolerance may not exist at all says surprising new study

(Natural News) Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity, which affects more than 18 million Americans, may be something that is all in the mind, a new study claims. Australian scientist Peter Gibson, who ironically confirmed in a 2011 study that patients without Celiac Disease can otherwise be sensitive to gluten, now refutes his previous findings with his new research.

Gibson examined 37 self-identified patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) who were given gluten-containing meals at varying levels for two weeks. Research data revealed that gluten-specific effects were observed in only 8% of respondents. However, these gluten-specific effects were not reproduced, suggesting that there is no evidence linking dose-dependent gluten intake and gastrointestinal discomfort in self-identified patients with NCGS. “In contrast to our first study… we could find absolutely no specific response to gluten,” Gibson said.

Glyphosate-contaminated wheat might be behind gastrointestinal issues

While current research debunks the correlation between gluten consumption and NCGS-related discomfort, the bigger issue at hand might be the culprit for such occurrence – glyphosate contamination.

The National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) classifies glyphosate as an herbicide and is used to help promote plant growth. It was first registered in the U.S. in 1974 and has since become the most widely-used herbicide on the market. According to the NPIC, glyphosate is not likely to evaporate after being sprayed. It is considered a probable human carcinogen according to the World Health Organization’s Agency for Research on Cancer.

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Glyphosate is sprayed directly on crops – including soy, corn, canola and sugar beet – that are genetically modified to resist it. The toxic chemical is also being sprayed on staple crops such as wheat, barley and oats, ahead of harvest. Wheat in all its forms – such as cold cereals and bagels – is a readily available breakfast fix for most parts of the world. Alarming reports of glyphosate contamination has been raising food safety concerns for years.

An April 2016 report by the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) USA revealed that 10 of 24 breakfast foods examined tested positive for some levels of glyphosate. Included in these breakfast items were whole-wheat bagels and oatmeal, as well as eggs, yogurt and coffee creamers. The ANH said the results show that the toxic herbicide is entering the market in many ways, either being sprayed directly on crops like wheat or through livestock feed. “The fact that it is showing up in foods like eggs and coffee creamer, which don’t directly contact the herbicide, shows that it’s being passed on by animals who ingest it in their feed,” Gretchen DuBeau, executive and legal director of ANH-USA stated.

Nonprofit organizations Food Democracy Now! and The Detox Project also released a report in November 2016, which compiled a list of food products that contain glyphosate residue. Included on the list are wheat-based products such as a cold cereal and whole-wheat crackers. The testing was carried out at Anresco, an FDA-registered laboratory. “Frankly, such a high level of glyphosate contamination … [is] alarming and should be a wake-up call for any parent trying to feed their children safe, healthy and non-toxic food,” said Dave Murphy, executive director of Food Democracy Now!

Herbicide-resistant wheat growing in more states

In previous years, the USDA confirmed the propagation of Monsanto’s genetically engineered glyphosate-resistant wheat plants: First in 2013 when news broke out that Monsanto’s GMO wheat was being grown in Oregon, and the other one in 2016 where reports indicated GMO wheat propagation in Washington. Monsanto said the GMO wheat strains used were similar on both occasions. Monsanto’s rogue GMO wheat is shown to resist glyphosate.

Propagation of genetically engineered wheat is not allowed for commercial or production use in the U.S. and around the world.

Sources include:

WakingTimes.com

NPIC.edu

IARC.fr

EcoWatch.com 1

EcoWatch.com 2

HuffingtonPost.com


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