Home
Subscribe (free)
About NaturalNews
Contact Us
Write for NaturalNews
Media Info
Advertising Info

Breast cancer

Eating Mushrooms Slashes Risk of Breast Cancer by Two-Thirds

Tuesday, June 23, 2009 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer
Tags: breast cancer, health news, Natural News


Most Viewed Articles
https://www.naturalnews.com/026495_cancer_mushrooms_breast.html
Delicious
diaspora
Print
Email
Share

(NaturalNews) Regular mushroom consumption can decrease a woman's risk of breast cancer by two thirds, researchers have found.

Scientists from the University of Western Australia in Perth conducted a study on 2,018 Chinese women, half of whom had been diagnosed with breast cancer. After adjusting for known cancer risk factors such as obesity, smoking, lack of exercise and lower education level, the researchers found that women who ate at least 10 grams of button mushrooms per day were 64 percent less likely to develop the disease. Women who ate dried mushrooms regularly also significantly reduced their cancer risk, although not by as much.

The study was published in the International Journal of Cancer.

This is not the first time scientists have found evidence of mushrooms' cancer-fighting properties. Laboratory studies have found that mushrooms may suppress the body's production of the sex hormone estrogen, much like the breast cancer drugs known as aromatose inhibitors. High estrogen levels are a well-known risk factor for breast cancer.

Mushrooms have also been found to strengthen the body's immune function and block tumor development. Mushroom extract has been shown to stop the growth of breast cancer cells, sparking an ongoing study into whether taking mushroom extract twice per month can prevent a recurrence of the disease.

While the Chinese study focused on the culinary mushrooms Agaricus bisporus (button mushrooms), the study on extracts is focusing on the traditional medicinal mushroom Phellinus linteus. In Eastern medicine, this mushroom is used to help refresh the body and lengthen lifespan.

Researchers believe that P. linteus acts by blocking the action of an enzyme known as AKT, which plays a role in controlling cell growth. Prior studies have suggested that the mushroom hampers the activity of skin, lung and prostate cancer cells. It reduces uncontrollable cell growth and blocks the development of blood vessels that keep tumors alive.

Sources for this story include: www.telegraph.co.uk; news.bbc.co.uk; uk.reuters.com.

Receive Our Free Email Newsletter

Get independent news alerts on natural cures, food lab tests, cannabis medicine, science, robotics, drones, privacy and more.


comments powered by Disqus


Natural News Wire (Sponsored Content)

Science.News
Science News & Studies
Medicine.News
Medicine News and Information
Food.News
Food News & Studies
Health.News
Health News & Studies
Herbs.News
Herbs News & Information
Pollution.News
Pollution News & Studies
Cancer.News
Cancer News & Studies
Climate.News
Climate News & Studies
Survival.News
Survival News & Information
Gear.News
Gear News & Information
Glitch.News
News covering technology, stocks, hackers, and more