Home
Newsletter
Events
Blogs
Reports
Graphics
RSS
About Us
Contact Us
Write for Us
Media Info
Advertising Info
Hypertension

Working more than 40 hours a week raises blood pressure, research discovers

Wednesday, August 30, 2006 by: NewsTarget
Tags: hypertension, employee health, health news


Most Viewed Articles
https://www.naturalnews.com/020234_hypertension_employee_health.html
Delicious
diaspora
Print
Email
Share

(NewsTarget) According to a University of California Irvine analysis of the more than 24,000 respondents to the 2001 California Health Interview Survey, people who work more than 40 hours a week are at an increased risk for high blood pressure, a condition that has been linked to heart disease and is suffered by millions of people worldwide.

The survey respondents were between 18 and 64 years of age and worked at least 11 hours a week. Each was asked over the telephone about his or her work schedule. After compensating for factors such as smoking, race, gender, diabetes, education and income, the scientists reported their findings in the October issue of Hypertension, Journal of the American Heart Association, and it was discovered that: Compared to people who work a regular work week (defined as 39 hours or less) people who work for 40 hours a week had a 14 percent increased risk and those that worked more than 50 hours a week were 17 percent more at risk for high blood pressure; unskilled workers had a 50 percent increased risk of high blood pressure over professionals; and clerical workers had a 30 percent greater risk of high blood pressure than professionals.

Previous studies of Japanese workers linked some sudden deaths to overwork, leading authorities to impose limits on overtime in the country. According to Dr. Haiou Yang, Ph.D., and his colleagues, the European Union allows no more than a 48-hour workweek maximum while the United States has no laws to limit overtime work.

"Despite long-standing and widespread agreement that work hours should be limited, preventing excessive overtime remains a pressing issue for the United States," the researchers said, adding that the numbers were probably higher, since hypertension is a mostly silent disease and the survey relied on self-reported evidence.

"This study describes the correlation but not the cause of hypertension," explained Mike Adams, a consumer health advocate. "The likely factors responsible for this harmful effect include lack of exposure to sunlight and fresh air, nutrient depletion due to chronic stress, and poor eating habits of those in work environments that offer limited access to healthy food options," he said.

###


Receive Our Free Email Newsletter

Get independent news alerts on natural cures, food lab tests, cannabis medicine, science, robotics, drones, privacy and more.


comments powered by Disqus


Natural News Wire (Sponsored Content)

Science.News
Science News & Studies
Medicine.News
Medicine News and Information
Food.News
Food News & Studies
Health.News
Health News & Studies
Herbs.News
Herbs News & Information
Pollution.News
Pollution News & Studies
Cancer.News
Cancer News & Studies
Climate.News
Climate News & Studies
Survival.News
Survival News & Information
Gear.News
Gear News & Information
Glitch.News
News covering technology, stocks, hackers, and more