hibiscus

Seeking a low-cost solution to cardiovascular troubles? Hibiscus may be the answer

Friday, January 03, 2014 by: Carolanne Wright
Tags: hibiscus, herbal tea, cardiovascular health

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
White House admits staging fake vaccination operation to gather DNA from the public
EXCLUSIVE: Natural News tests flu vaccine for heavy metals, finds 25,000 times higher mercury level than EPA limit for water
Irrefutable proof we are all being sprayed with poison: 571 tons of toxic lead 'chemtrailed' into America's skies every year
Truvia sweetener a powerful pesticide; scientists shocked as fruit flies die in less than a week from eating GMO-derived erythritol
Russia taking McDonald's to court, threatens countrywide shutdown
Why does the CDC own a patent on Ebola 'invention?'
Senator who attacked Doctor Oz over dietary supplements received over $146,000 in campaign contributions from Big Pharma mega-retailer and Monsanto
Global warming data FAKED by government to fit climate change fictions
Oregon man serving prison sentence for collecting rainwater on his own property
HOAX confirmed: Michelle Obama 'GMOs for children' campaign a parody of modern agricultural politics
Ebola outbreak may already be uncontrollable; Monsanto invests in Ebola treatment drug company as pandemic spreads
Ben & Jerry's switches to non-GMO, Fair Trade ice cream ingredients
Diet soda, aspartame linked to premature deaths in women
Elliot Rodger, like nearly all young killers, was taking psychiatric drugs (Xanax)
Right to farm being stripped from Americans: Michigan to criminalize small family farms with chickens, goats, honey bees and more
BREAKING: CDC whistleblower confesses to MMR vaccine research fraud in historic public statement
Monsanto's seed imperialism halted in Canada thanks to massive protests
5 powerful antibiotics that don't require a prescription
Delicious
(NaturalNews) If you have traveled to Mexico, then chances are that you've seen the vibrant, scarlet-hued herbal tea known as hibiscus. Commonly referred to as "sour drink" in Iran, hibiscus not only is a refreshingly tart brew but also has been used worldwide as an effective medicinal beverage. Rich in vitamin C, alkaloids and bioflavonoids, this bright-red elixir is traditionally used for supporting respiratory and cardiovascular health, lowering blood pressure, maintaining fluid balance and alleviating insomnia. And now, contemporary research has validated the herb as a health-promoting tonic in a variety of areas.

Historical uses, modern applications

Originally grown in Angola, the cultivation of Hibiscus sabdariffa has spread around the world to such subtropical regions as Sudan, China, Egypt, Mexico and Thailand.

"In Egypt and Sudan, hibiscus is used to help maintain a normal body temperature, support heart health, and encourage fluid balance. North Africans have used hibiscus internally for supporting upper respiratory health including the throat throat and also use it topically to support skin health. In Europe, hibiscus has been employed to support upper respiratory health, alleviate occasional constipation, and promote proper circulation. It is commonly used in combination with lemon balm and St John's Wort for restlessness and occasional difficulty falling asleep," states Naturopathic Doctor Tori Hudson.

Presently, studies on hibiscus have shown it to be beneficial for reducing cadmium toxicity [1], easing Parkinson's disease [2] and lowering blood pressure. [3][4][5]

Moreover, research has indicated a positive connection between hibiscus consumption and managing metabolic syndrome, as well as cholesterol levels. Dr. Hudson notes:

"Hibiscus extract was also studied in 222 patients--some with and some without metabolic syndrome (MS). A total daily dose of 100 mg H. sabdariffa extract powder (HSEP) was given for 1 month to men and women, 150 without MS and 72 with MS. Participants were randomly assigned to a preventive diet, HSEP treatment or diet combined with HSEP treatment. The MS patients receiving HSEP had significantly reduced glucose, total cholesterol and LDLc and increased HDLc. A triglyceride lowering effect was seen in all groups but was only significant in the control group that was treated with diet. The triglyceride/HDL-c ratio was also significantly reduced with HSEP in the control and MS groups, indicating an improvement in insulin resistance. It has been hypothesized that the anthocyanins regulate adipocyte function, which has important implications for both preventing and treating metabolic syndrome."

Sources:

1. Influence of aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. petal on cadmium toxicity in rats., Asagba, S O;Adaikpoh, M A;Kadiri, H;Obi, F O, Biological trace element research, 2007. Retrieved on November 29, 2013, from: http://science.naturalnews.com

2. Methanolic extract of Hibiscus asper leaves improves spatial memory deficits in the 6 hydroxydopamine lesion rodent model of Parkinson's disease. Foyet, Harquin Simplice;Hritcu, Lucian;Ciobica, Alin;Stefan, Marius;Kamtchouing, Pierre;Cojocaru, Dumitru, Publication: Journal of ethnopharmacology, 2011. Retrieved on November 29, 2013, from: http://science.naturalnews.com

3. Hibiscus sabdariffa L. tea (tisane) lowers blood pressure in prehypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults, McKay, Diane L;Chen, C-Y Oliver;Saltzman, Edward;Blumberg, Jeffrey B, The Journal of nutrition, 2010. Retrieved on November 29, 2013, from: http://science.naturalnews.com

4. The effects of sour tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa) on hypertension in patients with type II diabetes, H Mozaffari-Khosravi1, B-A Jalali-Khanabadi2, M Afkhami-Ardekani3, F Fatehi3 and M Noori-Shadkam4, Journal of Human Hypertension, 2008. Retrieved on November 29, 2013, from: http://www.nature.com

5. Clinical effects produced by a standardized herbal medicinal product of Hibiscus sabdariffa on patients with hypertension. A randomized, double-blind, lisinopril-controlled clinical trial, Herrera-Arellano A, Miranda-Sanchez J, Avila-Castro P, Herrera-Alvarez S, Jimenez-Ferrer JE, Zamilpa A, Roman-Ramos R, Ponce-Monter H, Tortoriello J. Planta Med. 2007 Jan;73(1):6-12. Retrieved on November 29, 2013, from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://naturalmedicinejournal.com

http://www.biomedcentral.com

http://www.gaiaherbs.com

About the author:
Carolanne believes if we want to see change in the world, we need to be the change. As a nutritionist, natural foods chef and wellness coach, she has encouraged others to embrace a healthy lifestyle of green living for over 13 years. Through her website www.Thrive-Living.net, she looks forward to connecting with other like-minded people who share a similar vision.

Follow on Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Thrive-Living/4995788...

For Pinterest fans: www.pinterest.com/thriveliving/

Find at Google+: www.goo.gl/cEZiyR

and Twitter: www.twitter.com/Thrive_Living

Read her other articles on Natural News here:

www.naturalnews.com/Author1183.html

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.