The ultimate craving - How industry designs food to be as addictive as narcotics (and keeps us coming back for more)

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 by: Carolanne Wright
Tags: processed food, cravings, addiction

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
BACK INTO THE CLOSET: Why U.S. reporters are not allowed to write about rainbow events in nations where being gay is still condemned
Depopulation test run? 75% of children who received vaccines in Mexican town now dead or hospitalized
A family destroyed: Six-month-old dies after clinic injects baby with 13 vaccines at once without mother's informed consent
INVESTIGATION: Three days before Dr. Bradstreet was found dead in a river, U.S. govt. agents raided his research facility to seize a breakthrough cancer treatment called GcMAF
BAM! Chipotle goes 100% non-GMO; flatly rejecting the biotech industry and its toxic food ingredients
BOMBSHELL: China and America already at war: Tianjin explosion carried out by Pentagon space weapon in retaliation for Yuan currency devaluation... Military helicopters now patrolling Beijing
ECONOMIC SLAVERY FOR ALL: While we were distracted with the Confederate flag flap, Congress quietly forfeited our entire economic future via fast-track trade authority
March Against Monsanto explodes globally... World citizens stage massive protests across 38 countries, 428 cities... mainstream media pretends it never happened
GMO crops totally banned in Russia... powerful nation blocks Monsanto's agricultural imperialism and mass poisoning of the population
SCOTUS same-sex marriage decision may have just legalized the concealed carry of loaded firearms across all 50 states, nullifying gun laws everywhere
Nearly every mass shooting in the last 20 years shares one surprising thing? and it's not guns
Vicious attack on Dr. Oz actually waged by biotech mafia; plot to destroy Oz launched after episode on glyphosate toxicity went viral
Holistic cancer treatment pioneer Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez dies suddenly; patients mourn the loss of a compassionate, innovative doctor who helped thousands heal from cancer
Pepsi drops aspartame from diet soda as consumers reject toxic sweetener
Bride of Frankenfood: Hillary Clinton pushes GMO agenda... hires Monsanto lobbyist... takes huge dollars from Monsanto
Wild eyes and bowl cuts: Why do mass shooters always share the same hair styles and crazed zombie stares?
Mind control through emotional domination: How we're all being manipulated by the "crisis of the NOW"
Genetically white woman now claims self-identify as black: If you can choose your gender, can you also choose your race? What about your species? Can a human claim to be a llama?
(NaturalNews) It's not surprising that processed foods are designed to foster addictive behavior -- robbing us of our health, serenity and hard-earned cash. Sugar, fat, salt and artificial flavors are manipulated in such a way that after one taste, consumers just cannot help themselves and a vicious cycle begins. Not only ingredients, but texture, shape and 'mouth feel' are all heavily researched and refined to create a highly pleasurable experience as well. Even though the average American does not view junk food as an addiction, researchers have discovered unhealthy food can actually seize the brain in the same way nicotine, cocaine and other drugs do -- leaving us at the mercy of cravings and binges.

Processed food - The devil is in the details

Picture for a moment two pieces of chocolate. Both have identical ingredients and are processed in the same manner except for one crucial difference: shape. One is square and the other round. The commercial food industry is betting the latter will be the chocolate of choice -- hooking more repeat customers while selling a higher volume. Incredibly, the size and shape of chocolate is big business. For three years, Nestle studied the "detection mechanisms in the oral cavity" and "improving melt-in-mouth quality while simultaneously reserving enough space in the mouth for the aroma to enrich the sensorial experience," according to their press release. In a nutshell, the round shape will bring greater pleasure and higher consumption rates while increasing corporate profits. And Nestle is just one instance. In the highly competitive field of processed and fast food, neuroscience has entered the scene to help create the most addictive, lucrative and sought-after junk food.

Consider "sensory-specific satiety." Industry developers label this holy grail the 'bliss point.' The idea is where a food does does not completely satisfy, but is pleasurable enough to induce cravings. Michael Moss explains in the New York Times article, "The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food:"

"The biggest hits - be they Coca-Cola or Doritos - owe their success to complex formulas that pique the taste buds enough to be alluring but don't have a distinct, overriding single flavor that tells the brain to stop eating."

Interestingly, nicotine and narcotic addictions hijack the brain in a similar fashion.

Irresistible allure of engineered edibles

Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, believes there is a "tremendous overlap between drugs in the brain and food in the brain." A good example is found with research at The Scripps Research Institute. The investigation showed "...the same molecular mechanisms that drive people into drug addiction are behind the compulsion to overeat, pushing people into obesity." During the three year experiment, rats were fed either a nutritious diet or one that was extremely unhealthy yet very palatable. According to Associate Professor Paul J. Kenny:

"In the study, the animals completely lost control over their eating behavior, the primary hallmark of addiction. They continued to overeat even when they anticipated receiving electric shocks, highlighting just how motivated they were to consume the palatable food."

Kenny continues, "what happens in addiction is lethally simple. The reward pathways in the brain have been so overstimulated that the system basically turns on itself, adapting to the new reality of addiction, whether its cocaine or cupcakes ... These findings confirm what we and many others have suspected, that overconsumption of highly pleasurable food triggers addiction-like neuroadaptive responses in brain reward circuitries, driving the development of compulsive eating."

Sources for this article include:

About the author:
Carolanne believes if we want to see change in the world, we need to be the change. As a nutritionist, wellness coach and natural foods chef, she has encouraged others to embrace a healthy lifestyle of green living for over 13 years. Through her website she looks forward to connecting with other like-minded people who share a similar vision.

Follow on Facebook:

For Pinterest fans:

Find at Google+:



and Twitter:

Read her other articles on Natural News here:

Follow real-time breaking news headlines on
Processed food at
Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...


Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source:

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.