robot

Military designing killer robots capable of behavioral deception

Wednesday, December 05, 2012 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer
Tags: killer robots, military, deception

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
CDC issues flu vaccine apology: this year's vaccine doesn't work!
Tetanus vaccines found spiked with sterilization chemical to carry out race-based genocide against Africans
Biologist explains how marijuana causes tumor cells to commit suicide
Companies begin planting microchips under employees' skin
NJ cops bust teenagers shoveling snow without a permit
Russia throws down the gauntlet: energy supply to Europe cut off; petrodollar abandoned as currency war escalates
McDonald's in global profit free fall as people everywhere increasingly reject chemically-altered toxic fast food
Chemotherapy kills cancer patients faster than no treatment at all
U2's Bono partners with Monsanto to destroy African agriculture with GMOs
FDA targets Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps for sharing health benefits of coconut oil
Why flu shots are the greatest medical fraud in history
Flu vaccine kills 13 in Italy; death toll rises
600 strains of an aerosolized thought control vaccine already tested on humans; deployed via air, food and water
Italian court rules mercury and aluminum in vaccines cause autism: US media continues total blackout of medical truth
The 21 curious questions we're never allowed to ask about vaccines
Vicious attack on Dr. Oz actually waged by biotech mafia; plot to destroy Oz launched after episode on glyphosate toxicity went viral
CDC admits it has been lying all along about Ebola transmission; "indirect" spread now acknowledged
Orthorexia Nervosa - New mental disorder aimed at people who insist on eating a clean diet

Delicious
(NaturalNews) In a Navy-funded study, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have successfully designed robots that are capable of deception. The study is part of a wider trend toward smarter and more autonomous battlefield robots. It was published in the journal IEEE Intelligent Systems.

Lead researcher Ronald Arkin and his students programmed robots for deception in two separate experiments, each modeled on the natural behavior of a different animal. The first experiment was based on the behavior of squirrels that store acorns in specific caches throughout their range and then patrol the area to keep scavengers away. Normally, these squirrels will travel from cache to cache in order to check on them. In the presence of another squirrel; however, they will instead begin visiting empty caches.

The researchers used this model to design an experiment in which one robot was attempting to raid hidden locations guarded by another robot. Using the same strategy as the squirrels, the guard robot was successfully able to deceive the predator robot.

"This application could be used by robots guarding ammunition or supplies on the battlefield," Arkin said. "If an enemy were present, the robot could change its patrolling strategies to deceive humans or another intelligent machine, buying time until reinforcements are able to arrive."

The second experiment was based upon the behavior of a bird known as an Arabian babbler. Like many birds, babblers will often join together to harass ("mob") larger predators such as hawks, thereby chasing them away. Using computer modeling, the researchers concluded that a weak babbler would benefit most from enthusiastically joining in mobbing behavior, because predatory birds in such situations are overwhelmed more by the number of attackers than by their individual strengths. In contrast, a weak bird that is "honest" about its strength and hangs back is more likely to be eaten.

"In military operations, a robot that is threatened might feign the ability to combat adversaries without actually being able to effectively protect itself," said Arkin. "Being honest about the robot's abilities risks capture or destruction. Deception, if used at the right time in the right way, could possibly eliminate or minimize the threat."

Ethical questions

Arkin acknowledges that giving robots the ability to deceive humans creates serious ethical questions.

"When these research ideas and results leak outside the military domain, significant ethical concerns can arise," he said.

Lethal robots are already in use by the U.S. military. Although, to date, they all require human controllers. Arkin is among the researchers who have declared the eventual development and deployment of autonomous killing robots to be "inevitable."

Some of Arkin's other research involves designing programs to teach robots to distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate targets, as defined by the rules of war. But his program presupposes a battlefield free of civilians, where every human is a legitimate target. Other researchers have criticized this condition as being essentially impossible.

"I challenge you to find a war with no civilians," said Colin Allen of Indiana University.

Sources:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121203125252.htm
http://news.discovery.com/tech/robot-warrior-ethical-guide.html
http://www.naturalnews.com/023867_robots_robot_military.html
http://www.naturalnews.com/027584_military_robots.html

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.