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Pale produce

Report confirms importance of eating pale produce, 'a forgotten source of nutrients'

Friday, February 21, 2014 by: Antonia
Tags: pale produce, nutrients, potatoes

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(NaturalNews) According to a report in Advances in Nutrition, a journal published by the American Society for Nutrition, it's high time that we take a closer look at the health benefits of pale produce, not just colorful ones. The report, "White Vegetables: A Forgotten Source of Nutrients," outlines the benefits of pale produce and suggests that Americans consider incorporating more of them in their diets to obtain the nutrients that are often overlooked in favor of foods that have deeper hues.

"It's recommended that the variety of fruits and vegetables consumed daily should include dark green and orange vegetables, but no such recommendation exists for white vegetables, even though they are rich in fiber, potassium and magnesium," says Connie Weaver, professor of nutrition science at Purdue University. "Overall, Americans are not eating enough vegetables, and promoting white vegetables, some of which are common and affordable, may be a pathway to increasing vegetable consumption in general."

Weaver explains that such vegetables include, but are not limited to, onions, parsnips, potatoes, mushrooms and cauliflower.

Let's take a closer look at a few of these pale vegetables and their related health benefits.

Potatoes

"A potato actually has more potassium than a banana," says Weaver. It's considered the third most abundant mineral in our bodies and, as such, is important in everything from regulating electrolyte balance to lowering blood pressure.

Fennel

Fennel is a good source of fiber, potassium and folate, making this pale vegetable ideal for cardiovascular and colon health.

Onions

Onions are blooming with antioxidants that have been shown to help with protection against heart disease and cancer. In fact, a study in the European Journal of Epidemiology showed that women who ate more onion than garlic actually had a reduced risk of breast cancer.

Mushrooms

Ready to banish belly fat? Mushrooms are a good source of vitamin D. Since low vitamin D levels have been linked to the need for people to loosen their belts another notch or two, eating more mushrooms can help keep waistlines trim.

Do you incorporate pale produce into your diet? Let us know your thoughts and what favorites you have. Click the share and like buttons on this page.

Sources for this article include:

blog.foodnetwork.com

www.livestrong.com

www.self.com

www.naturalnews.com

www.whfoods.com

www.purdue.edu

www.organicfacts.net

http://science.naturalnews.com

About the author:
A science enthusiast with a keen interest in health nutrition, Antonia has been intensely researching various dieting routines for several years now, weighing their highs and their lows, to bring readers the most interesting info and news in the field. While she is very excited about a high raw diet, she likes to keep a fair and balanced approach towards non-raw methods of food preparation as well. >>> Click here to see more by Antonia

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