naturalnews.com printable article

Originally published November 14 2012

Potassium Iodide radiation protection tablets now available at the Natural News Store

by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, NaturalNews Editor

(NaturalNews) No emergency preparedness kit is complete without potassium iodide (KI) to protect every family member from radiation. In a world where a Fukushima-style disaster could happen any day, potassium iodide is an FDA-approved supplement that's scientifically proven to help protect your body from radiation.

Specifically, if potassium iodide is taken before exposure to a large-scale radiation event (or radioactive fallout), it will prevent radioactive isotopes from concentrating in the thyroid gland and "burning out" the thyroid (which usually leads to thyroid cancer).

This is exactly what the U.S. government hands out to its own workers for nuclear emergencies.

Click here to get potassium iodide discounted at the Natural News Store.

IOSAT Potassium Iodide

We've selected the IOSAT brand of potassium iodide because it is approved by the FDA and manufactured under rigorous quality controls. Each package of the IOSAT brand potassium iodide delivers 14 tablets, each with 130mg of potassium iodide.

BEWARE of people offloading old or expired KI tablets. We've found that some sellers on Amazon.com and eBay are selling old or expired KI pills, heavily discounted to try move them out. This is a bit of a roll of the dice for customers, because active ingredients may become weakened over time. Always know the expiration date of KI tablets before purchasing them.

The batch we're currently selling is labeled on each tablet blister with an expiration date of April, 2019. Beyond that date, there will be some loss of effectiveness of the active ingredient, but this gives you 6+ years of worry-free protection from any nuclear radiation emergency.

The Natural News Store sells only freshly-acquired potassium iodide that we purchased directly from the manufacturer. Based on our current sales volume, we will likely be ordering a fresh batch every 60 - 90 days. So no matter when you order from us, you know it's the real product, as advertised, and that it was recently manufactured.

We store all our store products in a climate-controlled environment with low humidity and cool temperatures. This helps ensure the quality and potency of everything we sell.

Click here to get potassium iodide discounted at the Natural News Store.

Very portable, easy to store

The "blister strip" format of these IOSAT potassium iodide tablets makes them super easy to carry. Unlike a typical vitamin bottle, this blister packing can be slipped into a purse or a pocket. The pills are easily hidden in a sock or another piece of clothing, if needed.

The 14-tablet blister pack is ideal for handing out to family members without having to count pills. Each adult is directed to take one pill per day during a nuclear radiation emergency (1/2 tablet daily for children over 3 years). This means one package of IOSAT potassium iodide covers two adults for one week, or four adults for roughly half a week.

Facts about nuclear radiation fallout

In the case of nuclear war, radiation decays surprisingly quickly. Even if you live in an area hit almost directly by a nuclear strike, you would not have to spend more than two weeks living in an underground shelter.

The rule you need to know is the "seven-ten" rule which states that every seven to the nth hours after the initial blast, the level of radiation falls by a factor of ten. Here's how the math works:

• Suppose a blast happens near your residence that causes the level of radiation in the air around you to be 1000 Rads / hour. That's a deadly dose, obviously, so you don't want to be running around outside during this time, or you will quickly die.

• 7 hours after the blast, that radiation would fall to 100 Rads / hour. This is still a deadly dose, of course.

• 49 hours after the blast (7 x 7), the radiation would fall to roughly 10 Rads / hour -- a level that's still deadly but starting to approach a margin of safety.

• 343 hours after the blast (7 x 7 x 7), the radiation would fall to roughly 1 Rad / hour. This is roughly two weeks after the blast. And this is the point where moving around in the blast zone becomes relatively "safe."

• 2400 hours after the blast (7 x 7 x 7 x 7), the radiation would fall to roughly 0.1 Rad / hour.

... and so on. Remember, this is called the "seven-ten" rule of guesstimating nuclear fallout radiation levels. Those of you who are mathematically inclined will notice this is not a straight line but a logarithmic curve. Such are the laws of physics, eh?

In great contrast to nuclear weapons which are, believe it or not, relatively "clean" radiological events, the nuclear meltdown of a nuclear power plant is orders of magnitude more deadly and persistent. That's why the area around Chernobyl, for example, is still not habitable by humans more than two decades later. If you live anywhere near a nuclear power plant that suffers a meltdown, take your potassium iodide and immediately flee the area. Do not return... EVER!

If you need this chart, you probably need to MOVE

While the above rule of thumb may be useful, underground shelter specialist Joel Skousen explains, "If you are concerned about building an underground shelter to survive a nuclear strike, you probably need to RELOCATE."

In other words, don't live in an area likely to be targeted with a nuclear strike. This means voting with your feet and getting out of areas like Colorado Springs, San Diego and other areas heavily fortified with U.S. nuclear missiles and military bases. If you live anywhere near a substantial military base, you are living in a target zone and would be wise to move. Check out the amazing book Strategic Relocation by Joel Skousen for detailed maps.

Other ingredients

In addition to the potassium iodide, IOSAT tablets also contain "filler" to provide enough mass for a physical tablet. The actual iodine content is microscopic, so they bulk up the tablet to make it large enough to handle with your fingers.

These other ingredients are things I would normally not want in a daily nutritional supplement. But because these are ingredients in something designed to emergency use only, they represent no problem whatsoever. I personally would not hesitate in the least to take these tablets in a nuclear emergency.

Those additional ingredients are magnesium stearate (a flow agent), microcrystalline cellulose (bulk fiber), silica gel (a binding agent) and sodium thiosulfate (a preservative).

Again, I don't want that stuff in my daily supplements, but I don't mind it in an emergency pill. After all, if there's a nuclear fallout event, swallowing a little magnesium stearate is going to be the least of your worries...

For those allergic to iodine...

Please note that a small percentage of people are allergic to iodine. Those individuals who have such allergies should obviously not take potassium iodide. Read the instructions provided with the product to make sure it is safe for you to consume.

Stock up now while it's easy to get

In the days following the Fukushima catastrophe, potassium iodide pills were wiped out of all supply in the USA. I remember seeing people selling KI pills on eBay for as much as $600 a bottle!

It turns out that the only time you can acquire potassium iodide is when the masses don't think they need it. But once word of a crisis starts to spread, all potassium iodide in the supply chain will be wiped out within hours or days.

So stock up now if you want some. Buy it today and you're set for the next 6+ years.





All content posted on this site is commentary or opinion and is protected under Free Speech. Truth Publishing LLC takes sole responsibility for all content. Truth Publishing sells no hard products and earns no money from the recommendation of products. NaturalNews.com is presented for educational and commentary purposes only and should not be construed as professional advice from any licensed practitioner. Truth Publishing assumes no responsibility for the use or misuse of this material. For the full terms of usage of this material, visit www.NaturalNews.com/terms.shtml