naturalnews.com printable article

Originally published September 7 2012

How to reduce your exposure to common pesticides

by PF Louis

(NaturalNews) Pesticides is the overall tag for insecticides and herbicides, among others. The suffix cide means to kill, as in homicide involves murdering humans. We do need pesticides for various protections against infestation in the garden, home, and our pets.

The problem is that most commercial pesticides were inspired or created by the poison gas industry (WWI nerve gas). The prevailing notion that if you can walk and talk after exposure, it's safe; ignores the fact that long-term, adverse effects occur from sub-lethal exposures to toxic commercial pesticides.

Toxic household insecticides create long term health hazards for dogs, cats, babies, children, and adults.

Long-term ailments on humans and other mammals include neurological issues and autoimmune diseases, depression, fertility issues, birth deformities, and even cancer, especially leukemia for youngsters. NaturalNews offers a list of articles on pesticide issues. (http://www.naturalnews.com/pesticides.html)

Pesticides used on produce also manage to create those same, negative health effects over time. Purchasing organic produce is the solution, but it's not always possible. Sometimes washing with a cheap white vinegar/water mix helps with produce not too heavily sprayed.

Here's a list of the "dirty dozen" most sprayed produce to avoid and the "clean 15" relatively safe produce that can be used with a little washing in lieu of organic. (http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/)

You can manage insects and other pests in and around your house and on your pets easily and effectively without toxic results.

Easy, safe, and effective pesticides for home use

Upon realizing that you have safer options, it would be wise to get rid of all the toxic pesticides you have on hand. Overall, the best long-term protection comes from cleaning up well, not leaving food out unless placed in mini-moats of water, and sealing cracks and holes, including those used for pipes and electrical conduits.

We have been conditioned to accept toxic mosquito repellents to spray on ourselves. Kind of crazy, eh? Especially when there are many natural, safe, and effective options listed in the following linked article. Go directly to the Mosquito Repellents section in the middle. (http://www.naturalnews.com/036676_West_Nile_virus_protection.html)

There are non-toxic household insecticides for flying and crawling insects like roaches and ants now more than ever. Apparently demand has forced supply. They usually contain an essential mint or lemon-based oil that has demonstrated insect extermination capability.

Here's an example of one such group: http://www.cleaningpro.com/products/a-z/i.htm. There are others now as well. Even a few insecticide companies that have also been using toxic formulas are beginning to offer safer insecticides with natural ingredients.

These safer choices do work without leeching toxic fumes into your home. Toxic solutions get wafted into the air to create long-term problems, with toddlers and pets even more at risk.

A popular, relatively safe choice for keeping crawling insects from invading is boric acid powder. However, though rated least toxic by beyondpesticides.org, it is still a little hazardous for toddlers and small pets.

Diatomaceous earth powder is safer unless breathed in to irritate the lungs. Silica gel is another safer choice than boric acid. Just make sure neither contains pyrethrins. They can all be placed into cracks, crevasses, and obscure locations to avoid toddler traffic.

Cayenne pepper powder, strategically placed, provides protection against ants. Simple, natural detergent in water solutions sprayed on plants or veggies in the garden will take care of most common pests.

Avoid toxic flea/tick collars for pets. One or two drops of 100 percent pure essential oil of citronella, rosemary, or rose geranium placed on an a highly absorbent collar weekly has been found to work well.

Kitty may not like citronella. Avoid getting the oils onto their skin or eyes.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.oeconline.org

http://www.beyondpesticides.org/

http://www.livingwithbugs.com/natural_pesticides.html

http://www.rodale.com/mosquito-protection

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/flea-and-tick-collars.html

http://www.naturalnews.com/032276_gardening_natural_pesticides.html





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