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Drought: California government caught violating its own water restrictions


Drought
(NaturalNews) The drought in California is nothing new; its been an ongoing issue for the last five years or so. Water conservation is a hot-button issue across the state, except perhaps for the government. Apparently, in what may be one of the most ridiculous displays of government ineptitude ever, many state buildings have been watering their artificial lawns.

That's right ladies and gentlemen – the Californian government has been wasting their most valuable resource on fake grass.

A recent investigation launched by CBS2 Los Angeles revealed that the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (DWP) has been using their sprinkler systems to water their buildings' artificial lawns. This news comes following claims from the department that they had "curtailed" their water usage. The Daily Sheeple reports, "A sign at one of their locations even read[s] 'We stopped watering the grass to do our part to save water.'" Isn't that just shameful?

Naturally, residents of the community have been absolutely outraged by this discovery. The government has instituted very strict regulations against these residents' own water usage that come with hefty fines and penalties. In just four months, the DWP manged to issue two dozen financial penalties to homeowners, according to CBS2. Amber Gordon, a resident who lives near the DWP's South LA substation, and has let her formerly green lawn turn brown to save water says, "They're quick to fine us for certain things: over-watering or whatever. That kind of raises questions."

CBS2's David Goldstein has also reported witnessing sprinklers running for a solid six minutes, watering the fake grass outside the South LA DWP building, with water streaming off the "grass" and into the sidewalks and streets. What is particularly interesting about this event is that it is a clear violation of city code. As reported by CBS2, the code states:

"No customer of the Department shall use water in a manner that causes or allows excess or continuous water flow or runoff onto an adjoining sidewalk, driveway, street, gutter or ditch."

Will the DWP see any kind of action for such violations? Probably not. Substations in Los Feliz and Studio City are also sporting sprinkler systems alongside their fake lawns, according to reports. So, its not just the South LA building; it's a lot of them. In fact, the DWP itself has stated that 10 locations are watered in this way weekly – that is a lot of water to be wasting.

In a meager attempt to defend themselves, Richard Harasick, director of water operations at the DWP, has come forward and declared that the agency is "rinsing" the artificial grass to "make it more sanitary." Apparently dogs sometimes pee on the fake grass, and Mr. Harasick and his colleagues don't like the way it smells. Clearly, this is all the reason they need to violate whatever regulations they want. We can't possibly expect government agencies to adhere to the same standards as normal people.

While it is understandable that dog pee smells, there is most certainly a more efficient and less wasteful way to fix their "problem." Use less water, perhaps. Maybe put up a fence? Regardless, there's no reason for them to be "rinsing" the grass and watering the street in the process.

The DWP clearly doesn't seem to grasp why their excessive use of water – that violates their own regulations – would be upsetting to the community. Other people have been fined for the same exact offense. The water-wasting behavior of the DWP reeks of elitist sentiments.

"Let them drink bottled water" may very well be California's new version of "Let them eat cake" if this government doesn't get itself under control.

Sources:

TheDailySheeple.com

LosAngeles.CBSLocal.com

Science.NaturalNews.com
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