hibiscus

Hibiscus tea is excellent to maintain healthy cholesterol and blood pressure levels


Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
Biologist explains how marijuana causes tumor cells to commit suicide
Companies begin planting microchips under employees' skin
NJ cops bust teenagers shoveling snow without a permit
Chemotherapy kills cancer patients faster than no treatment at all
U2's Bono partners with Monsanto to destroy African agriculture with GMOs
FDA targets Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps for sharing health benefits of coconut oil
Italian court rules mercury and aluminum in vaccines cause autism: US media continues total blackout of medical truth
Orthorexia Nervosa - New mental disorder aimed at people who insist on eating a clean diet
Whooping cough outbreak at Massachusetts high school affected only vaccinated students
Inuit Elders tell NASA Earth Axis Shifted
Vaccine flu shots still contain 25 micrograms mercury - 100 times the concentration of 'mercury-loaded' fish
Measles outbreak likely caused by vaccinated children, science shows
Baby formula is loaded with GMOs - Avoid these brands
Extreme trauma from male circumcision causes damage to areas of brain
Terminal stage IV lung cancer patient miraculously cured by cannabis oil
Costco stops selling antibiotic laden chicken in response to consumer demand
FDA cracks down Walmart, GNC, other companies selling supplements that do not contain the herbs on the label
McDonald's french fries found to contain Silly Putty ingredient and petroleum chemical

Delicious
(NaturalNews) Hibiscus is a greatly appreciated herb that usually grows in tropical areas around the globe. It was first discovered in Angola but its pleasing taste has become very popular through time amongst the North African, Middle Eastern and even European populations. It just also happens to be the state flower of Hawaii.

Although natives of India like to eat its dried leaves as if they were eating vegetables, most people prefer to make teas out of them and as a matter of fact, most teas happen to include hibiscus. It's a natural antioxidant that also has anti-cholesterol properties, but most importantly it can effectively lower blood pressure. Some of its most important alkaloids are quercetin and anthocyanins, with the latter seemingly having the most impact. Hibiscus has basically shown through many studies that it can work wonders with the cardiovascular system by opening the arteries and slowing the release of blood vessel-constricting hormones.

It seems to work exceptionally well with cases of either low or mild hypertension. A study from 2007 showed that by giving participants consistent doses of 250 mg of a dried powdered hibiscus extract, blood pressure was maintained at healthy levels.

Research shows that hibiscus tea can lower blood pressure

In 2010 the Journal of Nutrition reported on a study that took place in the US with researchers aiming to find out if hibiscus had antihypertensive properties when confronted with mild cases of high blood pressure. Sixty-five individuals between the ages of 30 and 70 volunteered to take part in the trials for a period of six weeks. When compared with the placebo, the biggest change occurred with systolic pressure levels. Regardless of age, the hibiscus extract seemed to have a greater impact with individuals having higher systolic levels from the start.

Some tests done in 2007 showed hibiscus has the ability to normalize cholesterol levels. Forty-two individuals were given various doses of hibiscus extracts during a few weeks. Researchers noted that in order for cholesterol to remain at healthy levels, the most efficient dose hovered around 1000 mg being taken three times per day.

In a study that mostly included women out of a total of 60 participants, scientists were able to compare the effects between black tea and hibiscus tea. Although the main goal was to study blood sugar levels, after one month they realized that hibiscus was responsible for keeping LDL, HDL and the overall cholesterol at healthy levels. While hibiscus was effective across the board, black tea only positively influenced HDL levels.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.gaiaherbs.com

http://www.theepochtimes.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

About the author:
After spending several years working in property management and being a web consultant for PS Communications, P. Simard is now focusing on being a naturopath in Quebec.

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.