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Miracle

The miracle perspective that puts problems in their place (validated by science)

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 by: Mike Bundrant
Tags: miracle, perspective, optimistic people

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(NaturalNews) For decades, NLP practitioners have been teaching a simple yet profound "miracle" technique that puts problems in perspective and leads to solid, healthy choices. This method is so simple and powerful that most people wonder how it ever escaped them.

And now, it is validated by scientific research.

The NLP technique called visual dissociation is one of our students' favorite modules at the iNLP Center's online NLP training school.

Recent scientific research has finally proven this method and shown how helpful it can be. Of course, NLP is never mentioned in the study, but NLP practitioners are used to that!

Researchers from the University of Michigan and the University of California, Berkley have found that psychological distance (achieved through visual dissociation) may indeed be the solution. According to a series of studies conducted by psychologists Ethan Kross and Ozlem Ayduk, analyzing upset feelings from a psychologically distanced perspective provides a number of benefits.

According to Kross, most people aren't very good at analyzing their feelings. Mentally eviewing mistakes and negative emotions usually causes us to experience the negative emotions over and over again. Taking a psychologically distanced perspective can decrease this phenomenon and lead you to real freedom and choice.


Summary of the research

In 2008, Kross and Ayduk conducted a study that randomly assigned 141 test subjects to three groups. Groups were given different strategies to deal with negative emotional experiences. In the immersed-analysis group participants were asked to relive the situation.

In the distance-analysis group participants were asked to take a few steps back and view the situation objectively, and in the distraction group participants were asked to think of facts unrelated to their experience.

The study found that in the short term, both distraction and distance-analysis proved effective for dealing with depressive emotions. However, over the long term, those who used the distanced-analysis approach reported continued lower levels of depression than those in any other method.These effects appear to combat the negative physical effects of strong negative emotions as well.

In a related study, Kross and Ayduk found that participants who used distance-analysis strategies to examine feelings of anger experienced smaller blood pressure increases than those who used a more self-centric approach.

How to take a distant view, specifically

Getting distance is easy once you identify the internal image - the picture in your mind - that represents a particular problem. Think of one right now (a mild problem, please - such as a brief disagreement, having to wait in a long line, or feeling upset at your kids, etc...)

Now, notice the image in your mind the represents this situation and any feelings that go along with it. Next "push" the image off into the mental distance. Simply imagine this unpleasant image moving away from you until you can see yourself in it, as well as the larger context (other people, the setting, etc...)

Move the image far enough away that you begin to experience it as if you were an objective observer, as if you could say to yourself, "Those people over there are having a problem." Don't move it so far away that you can no longer see it, though. This is not about ignoring or repressing a problem, but taking a larger perspective.


Once you achieve inner distance from the problem, you can ask yourself useful questions, such as:

1. What can I learn from this?
2. What are my options?
3. How do I avoid this in the future?

Try it!

Interestingly, naturally optimistic people tend to distance themselves in this way from negative experiences, while keeping positive experiences close. Natural pessimists tend to do the opposite. Pessimists tend to remember negative events up close and personal, while distancing themselves from positive memories.

If you have a hard time creating the distance, then you may be more psychologically attached to the negativity than you thought. Psychological attachments lead to self-sabotage by clinging to negativity, pessimism, self-doubt, rejection, deprivation and more. In this case, you should discover your attachments and uproot them. You can start by watching this free video.

If you like this article, then like my Facebook Page to keep up with all my writing.

About the author:
Watch the free video The AHA! Process: An End to Self-Sabotage and discover the lost keys to personal transformation and emotional well-being that have been suppressed by mainstream mental health for decades.

The information in this video has been called the missing link in mental health and personal development. In a world full of shallow, quick-fix techniques, second rate psychology and pharmaceutical takeovers, real solutions have become nearly impossible to find. Click here to watch the presentation that will turn your world upside down.

Mike Bundrant is co-founder of the iNLP Center and host of Mental Health Exposed, a Natural News Radio program.

Follow Mike on Facebook for daily personal development tips.

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