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Fulvic acid

Fulvic acid: The amazing health secret you've never heard about

Saturday, January 18, 2014 by: Carolanne Wright
Tags: fulvic acid, detoxification, antioxidant

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(NaturalNews) If you would like to live to a healthy, ripe old age, take a cue from some of the most long-lived (and robust) people on the planet by consuming a diet rich in fulvic acid. Formed over thousands of years from microorganisms' decomposed organic matter, fulvic acid is at once nourishing and detoxifying. Offering outstanding protection against cognitive impairment, heavy metals and numerous health complaints - including diabetes, inflammation and chronic fatigue - fulvic acid has kept the Himalayan communities of India, Nepal and Pakistan sharp and resilient for centuries.

Health benefits

Fulvic acid is normally present in healthy soils, which is then absorbed by plants. Unfortunately, through modern farming practices and use of agricultural chemicals, fulvic acid levels have dropped substantially over the years. Modern water treatment facilities further remove this important element from our food supply. Considering that fulvic acid is a formidable antioxidant, is mineral-rich and dramatically improves the uptake and utilization of nutrients, it's no wonder that disease in westernized countries is rampant as exposure to naturally occurring fulvic acid declines.

According to Dr. Edward Group, founder of Global Healing Center:

"Fulvic acid is beneficial in part because as plants and other living things absorb high levels of fulvic acid, their biochemical reactions are sped up and become more efficient. Enzyme activity increases and cell membranes become more permeable. Water is able to enter cells at an above-normal rate. This is beneficial for both plants and animals by promoting balanced hydration and allowing the body to pass unwanted toxic substances."

Dr. Group continues: "Ingestion of fulvic acid is known to increase the ability of a cell to release toxic metals. Australia's Ecotoxicology Program found that when fish swam in water with fulvic acid, their aluminum toxicity levels were up to six times lower than otherwise."

Moreover, fulvic acid "actively takes part in the transportation of nutrients into deep tissues and helps to overcome tiredness, lethargy, and chronic fatigue. It also works effectively as a tonic for cardiac, gastric, and nervous systems, adaptogen and anti-stress agent."[1] Fulvic acid has been shown to discourage age-related cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, jaundice, bronchitis and anemia as well. Dr. Susan Lark, MD, a foremost authority in clinical nutrition and preventative medicine, recounts numerous testimonials from individuals using fulvic acid who believe it encouraged the healing of cancer, fibromyalgia, arthritis, wounds, autism and chronic pain.

And a study in the Indian Journal of Pharmacology found that fulvic acid is effective in curbing diabetes mellitus by reducing blood glucose levels and improving lipid profiles in laboratory animals.[2]

Fulvic acid in supplemental form

Beyond the sources of food and untreated water, people traditionally consume fulvic acid by adding it to fermented raw dairy, or as shilajit - a potent tar-like substance used in Ayurveda. Although supplementing with fulvic acid helps ensure a healthy future, it's important to heed the following warning by Dr. Lark:

"While fulvic acid increases the availability of essential minerals, it also can increase the intake of some minerals that may be toxic. Therefore it's crucial to find fulvic acid mineral complexes that are extracted from pure, unpolluted sources and tested for toxic heavy metals."


1. "Shilajit: A panacea for high-altitude problems" Harsahay Meena, H. K. Pandey, M. C. Arya, Zakwan Ahmed, Int J Ayurveda Res. 2010 Jan-Mar; 1(1): 37-40. Retrieved on November 25, 2013, from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

2. "Effect of shilajit on blood glucose and lipid profile in alloxaninduced diabetic rats" Trivedi, N. A. Mazumdar, B. Bhatt, J. D. Hemavathi, K. G. Indian Journal of Pharmacology 36(6). Retrieved on November 25, 2013, from: http://tspace.library.utoronto.ca






About the author:
Carolanne believes if we want to see change in the world, we need to be the change. As a nutritionist, wellness coach and natural foods chef, she has encouraged others to embrace a healthy lifestyle of green living for over 13 years. Through her website www.Thrive-Living.net she looks forward to connecting with other like-minded people who share a similar vision.

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Read her other articles on Natural News here:

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