McDonald

McDonald's urged its employees not to eat its own food

Friday, January 03, 2014 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer
Tags: McDonald''s, fast food workers, unhealthy diet

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(NaturalNews) Fast food giant McDonald's had a major "whoops!" moment recently after a resource website it created for its employees humorously advised them to stop eating its food. The U.K.'s Daily Mail reports that the so-called "McResource Line," which has since been taken offline, had contained "educational" imagery instructing McDonald's workers to avoid eating burgers and fries for their own health, and instead opt for "healthier" choices like cold-cut sandwiches and salads.

Part of a series on how to make healthier food choices, the images took the international spotlight after employees first noticed their contradictory nature and subsequently brought them up to the media. Advice about avoiding deep-fried foods and limiting consumption of "extras such as cheese, bacon and mayonnaise" became a running joke, as these are the types of foods that McDonald's pushes most heavily on its customers.

"[E]ating a diet high in fat puts people at risk for becoming overweight," read one of the image captions, which is no longer online. This is obviously confusing advice for the many thousands of McDonald's workers who are constantly bombarded by wafts of grease coming from the junk foods they serve all day long to their eager and addicted customers.

"It is hard to eat a healthy diet when you eat at fast-food restaurants often," continued the advice in amazing irony, as McDonald's employees are incentivized to eat fast food due to employee discounts and short breaks. "Many foods are cooked with a lot of fat, even if they are not trans fats. Many fast-food restaurants do not offer any lower-fat foods."

"Eat at places that offer a variety of salads, soups, and vegetables."

McDonald's defends dietary advice while simultaneously insisting it was taken out of context

In other words, you should not eat at McDonald's, McDonald's employees! This was the implication, anyway, before McDonald's officials decided to pull the infamous McResource Line altogether. A spokesman from the company later claimed that the advice had been misinterpreted and taken "out of context" but at the same time offered no real explanation as to why, then, it was taken completely offline.

"Portions of this website continue to be taken entirely out of context," reads an official statement from McDonald's. "This website provides useful information from respected third-parties about many topics, among them health and wellness. It also includes information from experts about healthy eating and making balanced choices. McDonald's agrees with this advice."

As you may recall, previous issues with the now-shuttered McResource Line included unusual advice about how McDonald's employees could sell their personal belongings or get a second job in order to make ends meet. The site also contained information about how to generously tip a house cleaner or dog walker, services that the average McDonald's employee making minimum wage is unlikely to be able to afford.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk

http://rt.com

http://townhall.com

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