drug

New antidepressant drug nearly identical to popular party drug

Tuesday, June 04, 2013 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer
Tags: Johnson & Johnson, special K, antidepressant drugs

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
CDC issues flu vaccine apology: this year's vaccine doesn't work!
Tetanus vaccines found spiked with sterilization chemical to carry out race-based genocide against Africans
Biologist explains how marijuana causes tumor cells to commit suicide
Companies begin planting microchips under employees' skin
NJ cops bust teenagers shoveling snow without a permit
Russia throws down the gauntlet: energy supply to Europe cut off; petrodollar abandoned as currency war escalates
McDonald's in global profit free fall as people everywhere increasingly reject chemically-altered toxic fast food
Chemotherapy kills cancer patients faster than no treatment at all
U2's Bono partners with Monsanto to destroy African agriculture with GMOs
FDA targets Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps for sharing health benefits of coconut oil
Why flu shots are the greatest medical fraud in history
Flu vaccine kills 13 in Italy; death toll rises
600 strains of an aerosolized thought control vaccine already tested on humans; deployed via air, food and water
Italian court rules mercury and aluminum in vaccines cause autism: US media continues total blackout of medical truth
The 21 curious questions we're never allowed to ask about vaccines
Vicious attack on Dr. Oz actually waged by biotech mafia; plot to destroy Oz launched after episode on glyphosate toxicity went viral
CDC admits it has been lying all along about Ebola transmission; "indirect" spread now acknowledged
Orthorexia Nervosa - New mental disorder aimed at people who insist on eating a clean diet

Delicious
(NaturalNews) Drug giant Johnson & Johnson (J&J), whose pharmaceutical and medical device products have been implicated in dozens of major recalls throughout the past several years, has announced it will seek approvals from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for 11 new drugs by the year 2017. And one of these new drugs, known as esketamine, contains a compound that is almost exactly the same as the active ingredient in the mind-altering party drug "Special K."

The controversial ingredient is known as ketamine, and while J&J's esketamine for depression is a slightly tweaked version of this psychoactive compound, its effects on the human body are amazingly similar. According to reports, esketamine's psychedelic properties take effect within just a few hours, as opposed to several weeks or even months for standard antidepressant drugs. And if used in excessive doses, esketamine can lead to short-term psychosis.

Last fall, researchers from Yale University and the National Institute of Mental Health discovered that actual ketamine from Special K can help relieve major depressive symptoms by potentially forming new nerve cells in the brain that regulate emotion and mood. Not surprisingly, these findings coincide directly with J&J's efforts to capitalize on this same compound by creating its own patented form of it.

Will esketamine be used to get depression patients 'high,' make them feel better through hallucination?

This same study revealed that, unlike existing antidepressants, ketamine can actually help induce the regeneration of new synapses in the brain. Within just two hours, trial participants who took ketamine were observed to have an increased production of synapse-associated proteins. And within 24 hours, completely new synapses were found to have formed in the brains of those who were previously lacking in these important neural connections.

"The hope is that this new information about ketamine is really going to provide a whole array of new targets that can be developed that ultimately provide a much better way of treating depression," said Ron Duman, a psychiatrist and neurobiologist at Yale University who helped work on the research. The discovery "represents maybe one of the biggest findings in the field over the last 50 years," he added, as quoted by NPR.org.

Human clinical trials involving esketamine are ongoing, and J&J's Janssen Research & Development, LLC is the division sponsoring them. J&J is also currently in the process of seeking FDA approval for drugs to treat hepatitis C, immune diseases, and schizophrenia; and vaccines for influenza, rabies, and polio.

"Pharma is now J&J's most attractive segment because they have moved past patent expirations and have a large number of new products," says Jeff Jonas, an analyst at investment brokerage Gabelli & Co., noting that J&J's consumer products and medical device divisions have suffered due to an excess of safety recalls in recent years.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.reuters.com

http://www.cnbc.com/id/100761958

http://www.npr.org

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.