squash

Feds raid indoor gardeners, find only tomatoes and squash plants

Friday, April 05, 2013 by: J. D. Heyes
Tags: indoor gardening, war on drugs, police raids

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
The five biggest lies about Ebola being pushed by government and mass media
Why does the CDC own a patent on Ebola 'invention?'
Ultraviolet light robot kills Ebola in two minutes; why doesn't every hospital have one of these?
EXCLUSIVE: Natural News tests flu vaccine for heavy metals, finds 25,000 times higher mercury level than EPA limit for water
Tetanus vaccines found spiked with sterilization chemical to carry out race-based genocide against Africans
Truvia sweetener a powerful pesticide; scientists shocked as fruit flies die in less than a week from eating GMO-derived erythritol
Irrefutable proof we are all being sprayed with poison: 571 tons of toxic lead 'chemtrailed' into America's skies every year
Russia taking McDonald's to court, threatens countrywide shutdown
Oregon man serving prison sentence for collecting rainwater on his own property
The best way to help your body protect itself against Ebola (or any virus or bacteria)
Global warming data FAKED by government to fit climate change fictions
Senator who attacked Doctor Oz over dietary supplements received over $146,000 in campaign contributions from Big Pharma mega-retailer and Monsanto
Healthy 12-year-old girl dies shortly after receiving HPV vaccine
Ebola outbreak may already be uncontrollable; Monsanto invests in Ebola treatment drug company as pandemic spreads
HOAX confirmed: Michelle Obama 'GMOs for children' campaign a parody of modern agricultural politics
Ben & Jerry's switches to non-GMO, Fair Trade ice cream ingredients
W.H.O. contradicts CDC, admits Ebola can spread via coughing, sneezing and by touching contaminated surfaces
BREAKING: CDC whistleblower confesses to MMR vaccine research fraud in historic public statement

Delicious
(NaturalNews) How insanely out-of-control has the war on drugs become? Apparently now, if all you do is buy equipment to grow plants and vegetables indoors is reason enough to suspect you of conducting illegal drug activity.

Case in point: State police and sheriff's deputies in Kansas raided the home of Adlynn and Robert Harte, two former CIA employees, in a fruitless search for marijuana as part of a two-state drug sweep in conjunction with Missouri police agencies - all because they had bought supplies to grow vegetables inside their home.

As a result of getting improperly swept up in the operation, the couple has filed suit "to get more information about why sheriff's deputies searched their home in the upscale Kanas City suburb of Leawood last April 20 as part of Operation Constant Gardener - a sweep conducted by agencies in Kansas and Missouri that netted marijuana plants, processed marijuana, guns, growing paraphernalia and cash from several other locations," The Associated Press reported.

That date has long been used by marijuana users as a way to celebrate the drug, which remains illegal on the federal level though voters in two states - Colorado and Washington - legalized it for recreational use last November.

'Public has an interest in knowing'

The Harte's attorney, Cheryl Pilate, says, however, that she believes her clients' 1,865-square-foot split level home was targeted because they recently purchased hydroponic gear to grow small numbers of tomatoes and squash in their basement.

"With little or no other evidence of any illegal activity, law enforcement officers make the assumption that shoppers at the store are potential marijuana growers, even though the stores are most commonly frequented by backyard gardeners who grow organically or start seedlings indoors," says the suit.

The suit was filed under the Kansas Open Records Act, but only after authorities in Johnson County and Leawood denied their initial requests to see records justifying the search of their particular home. Leawood officials went so far as to say they had no such relevant records, but the Hartes' say that answer isn't good enough. Per AP:

The Hartes say the public has an interest in knowing whether the sheriff's department's participation in the raids was "based on a well-founded belief of marijuana use and cultivation at the targeted addresses, or whether the raids primarily served a publicity purpose."

Said Adlynn Harte: "If this can happen to us and we are educated and have reasonable resources, how does somebody who maybe hasn't led a perfect life supposed to be free in this country?"

A great point. Unfortunately, few in power have a good answer to it.

'It was like Zero Dark Thirty'

In the suit, the couple said their two children, a 7-year-old daughter and 13-year-old son, were "shocked and frightened" by assault weapon-armed cops wearing bulletproof vests began pounding on the front door of their home around 7:30 a.m. nearly a year ago.

"It was just like on the cops TV shows," Robert Harte told AP. "It was like 'Zero Dark Thirty' ready to storm the compound."

The court filing says that, during the drug sweep, the Hartes were told cops had been watching them for months, but that the couple knows "of no basis for conducting such surveillance nor do they believe such surveillance would have produced any facts supporting the issuance of a search warrant."

The couple said they built the hydroponic garden with their son a few years ago, adding that they chose not to use the powerful light bulbs that marijuana growers typically use, meaning the family's electricity bills did not change dramatically. Authorities sometimes use changes in a residence's utility bills as an indicator of illicit activity, AP reported.

When cops searched their home, the Hartes' had only six plants growing in their basement - three tomato, one melon and two butternut squash plants.

Case could set a precedent on the federal level

In addition to being wrong about the Hartes, the lawsuit says deputies "made rude comments" to them and even went so far as to imply that their son was a dope smoker.

Pilate said the search was ridiculous in the first place because her clients don't use illegal drugs and because no charges were ever filed:

The lawsuit noted Adlynn Harte, who works for a financial planning firm, and Robert Harte, who cares for the couple's children, each were required to pass rigorous background checks for their previous jobs working for the CIA in Washington, D.C. Pilate said she couldn't provide any other details about their CIA employment.

"You can't go into people's homes and conduct searches without probable cause," Pilate said, adding that a successful lawsuit could serve as a basis for a future federal civil rights suit.

Sources:

http://stlouis.cbslocal.com

http://www.naturalnews.com/Marijuana.html

http://www.kctv5.com

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.