muscle

Muscle loss halted with alkaline diet and vitamins

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 by: Sherry Baker, Health Sciences Editor
Tags: muscle loss, alkaline diet, vitamins

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
CDC issues flu vaccine apology: this year's vaccine doesn't work!
Biologist explains how marijuana causes tumor cells to commit suicide
Depopulation test run? 75% of children who received vaccines in Mexican town now dead or hospitalized
BAM! Chipotle goes 100% non-GMO; flatly rejecting the biotech industry and its toxic food ingredients
Companies begin planting microchips under employees' skin
U2's Bono partners with Monsanto to destroy African agriculture with GMOs
NJ cops bust teenagers shoveling snow without a permit
Russia throws down the gauntlet: energy supply to Europe cut off; petrodollar abandoned as currency war escalates
McDonald's in global profit free fall as people everywhere increasingly reject chemically-altered toxic fast food
Chemotherapy kills cancer patients faster than no treatment at all
Why flu shots are the greatest medical fraud in history
600 strains of an aerosolized thought control vaccine already tested on humans; deployed via air, food and water
Flu vaccine kills 13 in Italy; death toll rises
Italian court rules mercury and aluminum in vaccines cause autism: US media continues total blackout of medical truth
The 21 curious questions we're never allowed to ask about vaccines
Vicious attack on Dr. Oz actually waged by biotech mafia; plot to destroy Oz launched after episode on glyphosate toxicity went viral
Orthorexia Nervosa - New mental disorder aimed at people who insist on eating a clean diet
Whooping cough outbreak at Massachusetts high school affected only vaccinated students

Delicious
(NaturalNews) Having weaker, smaller muscles isn't just a cosmetic problem for older people. It contributes to countless deaths and suffering in the elderly, too, because it puts them at high risk for falls and fractures. Mainstream medicine has long asserted that significant muscle loss is inevitable as you age, although exercise can help some.

What's more, muscle loss (technically called sarcopenia) doesn't just strike all of a sudden when you are extremely old, either. Muscle loss can start in your 30s. In a new article just published in Today's Dietician, Becky Dorner, RD, and Mary Ellen Posthauer, RD, note that, "between the ages of 30 and 60, the average adult will gain 1lb of weight and lose 1/2 lb of muscle yearly, a total gain of 30 lbs of fat and a loss of 15 lbs of muscle."

Although significant muscle loss may sound like a depressing part of aging, that is simply the fate of aging humans, there may be ways to stop it. Weight bearing exercise has long been known to benefit muscle strength but it turns out nutritional changes could be a key to avoiding and even reversing muscle loss due to age. A study recently published in the Osteoporosis International journal concludes that dietary strategies could be effective in halting muscle mass loss.

The new review of numerous worldwide studies by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) Nutrition Working Group identified these important nutritional factors shown to be not only likely beneficial to the prevention and maintenance of muscle mass but to the treatment of sarcopenia, as well:

Avoiding dietary acid loads. Excess intake of acid-producing nutrients (meat and cereal grains) and a low intake of alkalizing fruits and vegetables appear to have negative effects on the body's muscles and skeleton. The researchers noted that eating more fruits and vegetables should benefit both bones and muscles.

Protein. Adequate protein plays an integral part in muscle health. However, getting this protein from meat could be counter-productive because it raises the acidity of the body, possibly negatively impacting muscle mass.

Vitamin D. As Natural News has reported previously, many studies have indicated a role for vitamin D in building health in a host of ways - including the development and preservation of muscle mass and function. The new study recommends getting adequate vitamin D through exposure to sunlight and/or supplements.

Vitamin B12 and/or folic acid. The IOF researchers say more research is needed on these vitamins but they appear to play a role in improving muscle function and strength. In addition, the scientists are calling for more studies to see if antioxidants can potential prevent and treat sarcopenia, too.

"The most obvious intervention against sarcopenia is exercise in the form of resistance training," Professor Jean-Philippe Bonjour, co-author of the paper and Professor of Medicine at the University of Geneva, said in a press statement. "However, adequate nutritional intake and an optimal dietary acid-base balance are also very important elements of any strategy to preserve muscle mass and strength during aging."

Sources:

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00198-012-2236-y
http://www.iofbonehealth.org
http://www.naturalnews.com/038626_vitamin_D_muscles_strength.html
http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/090112p62.shtml

About the author:
Sherry Baker is a widely published writer whose work has appeared in Newsweek, Health, the Atlanta Journal and Constitution, Yoga Journal, Optometry, Atlanta, Arthritis Today, Natural Healing Newsletter, OMNI, UCLA''''s "Healthy Years" newsletter, Mount Sinai School of Medicine''''s "Focus on Health Aging" newsletter, the Cleveland Clinic''''s "Men''''s Health Advisor" newsletter and many others.

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.