justice

Ninety-six percent of public says Obamacare is unconstitutional - Washington Post poll

Saturday, March 31, 2012 by: J. D. Heyes
Tags: Obamacare, survey, popularity

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
BACK INTO THE CLOSET: Why U.S. reporters are not allowed to write about rainbow events in nations where being gay is still condemned
Depopulation test run? 75% of children who received vaccines in Mexican town now dead or hospitalized
INVESTIGATION: Three days before Dr. Bradstreet was found dead in a river, U.S. govt. agents raided his research facility to seize a breakthrough cancer treatment called GcMAF
A family destroyed: Six-month-old dies after clinic injects baby with 13 vaccines at once without mother's informed consent
Biologist explains how marijuana causes tumor cells to commit suicide
BOMBSHELL: China and America already at war: Tianjin explosion carried out by Pentagon space weapon in retaliation for Yuan currency devaluation... Military helicopters now patrolling Beijing
Companies begin planting microchips under employees' skin
BAM! Chipotle goes 100% non-GMO; flatly rejecting the biotech industry and its toxic food ingredients
ECONOMIC SLAVERY FOR ALL: While we were distracted with the Confederate flag flap, Congress quietly forfeited our entire economic future via fast-track trade authority
McDonald's in global profit free fall as people everywhere increasingly reject chemically-altered toxic fast food
March Against Monsanto explodes globally... World citizens stage massive protests across 38 countries, 428 cities... mainstream media pretends it never happened
Italian court rules mercury and aluminum in vaccines cause autism: US media continues total blackout of medical truth
SCOTUS same-sex marriage decision may have just legalized the concealed carry of loaded firearms across all 50 states, nullifying gun laws everywhere
Orthorexia Nervosa - New mental disorder aimed at people who insist on eating a clean diet
Vicious attack on Dr. Oz actually waged by biotech mafia; plot to destroy Oz launched after episode on glyphosate toxicity went viral
Nearly every mass shooting in the last 20 years shares one surprising thing? and it's not guns
Holistic cancer treatment pioneer Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez dies suddenly; patients mourn the loss of a compassionate, innovative doctor who helped thousands heal from cancer
Inuit Elders tell NASA Earth Axis Shifted
Delicious
(NaturalNews) As the U.S. Supreme Court decides the constitutionality of President Obama's signature healthcare "reform" law, the American public, for the most part, has already decided it isn't.

Granted, this online survey on the Washington Post website isn't very scientific, but it does provide at least some measure of the law's continuing unpopularity among the masses.

"The court should strike down the law. It is about personal accountability. The system has major flaws that need to be addressed. I think everyone can agree on that," said one respondent, starlifter1271.

"Congress's power to regulate markets cannot possibly mean the power to force any American, let alone every American, into any market, to become against their will a customer of some private concern as a condition of citizenship," wrote PrairieCalm.

And so on.

Many questions from the court usually means bad news

Apparently, even a majority of Supreme Court justices agree. According to the Los Angeles Times this week, some of the comments made by many of them "bode ill" for the law.

"How well can Supreme Court votes be predicted by what justices say in oral arguments? The statistics hold up pretty well, and offer gloomy tidings for the Obama administration and its healthcare law," the paper reported.

Simply adding up the number of comments justices make during oral arguments is a pretty good predictor of the outcome. For example, the paper said, researchers have found that the more often justices interrupt lawyers for one side of an argument or the other indicates trouble for that side.

A number of studies have examined the theory, including a study by USC (University of Southern California) law professor Lee Epstein, William M. Landes of the University of Chicago and Judge Richard A. Posner of the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Their examination was based on statistical analysis of Supreme Court oral arguments from 2004 through 2007. They found this: "The number of questions and the total words in question [...] provide a reasonable predictor of most Justices' votes," with the notable exception of Justice Clarence Thomas, who rarely speaks during oral arguments.

Justices, in their own words, seem to support overturning the law

Also, comments by the justices themselves seem to indicate a repeal is likely. Justice Anthony Kennedy, generally considered the high court's swing vote, appeared to favor repeal based on his comments during arguments earlier this week. In particular, Kennedy seemed troubled by the mandate in the law that requires you to purchase health insurance, or face a penalty. He said the requirement "changes the relationship of the federal government to the individual in a very fundamental way," adding that the mandate was "concerning" and suggesting it might even be "unprecedented."

Said the L.A. Times, in characterizing the verbiage and reaction of most of the justices, "Kennedy and (Chief Justice John) Roberts, along with fellow conservative Justices Antonin Scalia and Samuel A. Alito Jr., repeatedly questioned where the limit on federal power would be if the mandate was upheld. Justice Clarence Thomas was silent, as is his habit, but is expected to vote to strike down the mandate."

"If the government can do this, what else can it [...] do?" asked Alito at one point, hinting that Congress could eventually require Americans to buy other things, like cars and broccoli.

Roberts suggested Congress may want to require Americans to purchase cell phones so they could be contacted in times of emergency.

Kennedy's vote is being watched the most, and - based on his comments - it doesn't look good for the administration.

"Kennedy, who is often the court's swing vote, seemed to suggest that a mandate directed at individuals could be upheld only if the government offered an extremely powerful justification. And his comments from the bench raised considerable doubt about whether he thought the administration had met that test," the L.A. Times said.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.washingtonpost.com

http://www.latimes.com

http://articles.latimes.com

Follow real-time breaking news headlines on
Obamacare at FETCH.news
Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.