cheating

American Board of Radiology clamps down on rampant cheating among doctors seeking board certification

Wednesday, February 01, 2012 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer
Tags: radiology, cheating, board certification

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
Biologist explains how marijuana causes tumor cells to commit suicide
Companies begin planting microchips under employees' skin
NJ cops bust teenagers shoveling snow without a permit
Chemotherapy kills cancer patients faster than no treatment at all
U2's Bono partners with Monsanto to destroy African agriculture with GMOs
FDA targets Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps for sharing health benefits of coconut oil
Italian court rules mercury and aluminum in vaccines cause autism: US media continues total blackout of medical truth
Orthorexia Nervosa - New mental disorder aimed at people who insist on eating a clean diet
Whooping cough outbreak at Massachusetts high school affected only vaccinated students
Inuit Elders tell NASA Earth Axis Shifted
Vaccine flu shots still contain 25 micrograms mercury - 100 times the concentration of 'mercury-loaded' fish
Measles outbreak likely caused by vaccinated children, science shows
Baby formula is loaded with GMOs - Avoid these brands
Extreme trauma from male circumcision causes damage to areas of brain
Terminal stage IV lung cancer patient miraculously cured by cannabis oil
Costco stops selling antibiotic laden chicken in response to consumer demand
FDA cracks down Walmart, GNC, other companies selling supplements that do not contain the herbs on the label
McDonald's french fries found to contain Silly Putty ingredient and petroleum chemical

Delicious
(NaturalNews) Memorizing board certification test questions and relaying them to other doctors soon to take the test themselves has become common practice among radiology doctors seeking to become board certified. But the American Board of Radiology (ABR), as well as a number of educational institutions, are cracking down on this practice, known as "recalls," after escalating concerns about how this form of cheating could ruin the integrity of the board certification process.

CNN reports that Dr. Matthew Webb, an Army captain who was trained at the San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium (SAUSHEC), recently filed a complaint with ABR about the widespread use of recalls. Dr. Webb told the group that cheating had become so commonplace that even the program director of the radiology department where Dr. Webb studied had basically ordered him to use recalls in order to pass the test.

"We're outraged by this, and we took this case to our professionalism committee," said Dr. Gary Becker, executive director of ABR and overseer of the exam certification process, to CNN in response to Dr. Webb's complaint. While ABR's response has included cracking down on the use of recalls and reformatting the exam process beginning next year, Dr. Becker claims the use of recalls is not a health threat to patients since radiologists still must go through extensive training, and pass the rigorous test itself, in order to become certified.

Dr. Webb, on the other hand, says using recalls is the "ultimate betrayal of trust to patients," and the "most egregious and flagrant violation in academia." He told reporters that students in any other phase of schooling -- elementary school, high school, undergraduate studies, and graduate studies -- would not be allowed to get away with cheating, so why should radiologists?

Many other practicing radiologists, on the other hand, liken recalls to simple study guides that aid in the learning process. Since 50 percent of board certification exam questions change from year to year, and the fact that doctors must still successfully pass an unrehearsed oral exam, using recalls is just a practical way to study intense material, they say.

"If they had a test where you could study relevant radiology knowledge and they tested on it, that would be fine," said Dr. Joseph Deiber, a radiologist, to CNN. Dr. Dieber believes recalls are a "gray area," and says many of the questions on the board certification exam are "irrelevant to the modern practice of radiology," which is why recalls are widely used as study guides.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.cnn.com/2012/01/13/health/prescription-for-cheating/index.html

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.