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Rose hips

Rose hips provide vitamin C, relieve osteoarthritis, and may prevent diabetes

Saturday, January 28, 2012 by: Donna Earnest Pravel
Tags: rose hips, vitamin C, osteoarthritis

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(NaturalNews) When a rose fades and the petals drop off, the round seed pod that is left on the stem is called a rose hip. Rose hips are technically fruit. They are considered super-foods because rose hips contain more vitamin C than grapefruit and oranges. They also contain vitamins A, D, and E, iron, and powerful antioxidants. Rose hips have been clinically proven to lower cholesterol, improve diabetic conditions, and alleviate osteoarthritis.

Rose hips have been a well-known source of vitamin C for years

Rose hips have been used as a source of food for centuries, but it was not until World War II that clinical scientists discovered the healing potential for rose hips. Several medical studies were performed in the 1940s which showed the high levels of vitamin C contained in the tiny fruit. When Britain experienced difficulties in getting citrus fruit into the country during WWII, the British government began collecting rose hips to make rose hip syrup as a source of vitamin C.

Rose hips prevent diabetes and help lower cholesterol levels in mice

The American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism published a medical study in January 2011 showing the positive effects that rose hips have on diabetic mice. Rose hip powder was fed to diabetic mice, along with a high fat diet. Lean mice were fed this diet for twenty weeks, while obese mice were fed this diet for ten weeks. Rose hip powder was shown to be able to not only prevent a weight increase in the mice, the obese mice lost weight. Glucose tolerance tests showed the mice on a diet which included rose hip powder tolerated glucose better than the control mice. There was a reduction in fat cells (lipids) in the liver, as well.

In addition to these benefits, the total blood cholesterol in the mice who ate rose hip powder was lowered. The ratio between LDL and HDL cholesterol levels were also improved. The study concluded that rose hips prevented a diabetic state and lowered the lipid profile in mice.

Osteoarthritis relieved with rose hip powder

Clinical research has shown that rose hip powder relieves osteoarthritis in vitro. While the actual means of healing remain elusive, rose hip powder is known to be high in ascorbic acid (vitamin C), polyphenols (a type of antioxidant), and unsaturated fatty acids. Scientists believe that rose hip powder provides "robust" anti-inflammatory responses and reduce the catabolic processes found in osteoarthritis.

Sources for this article include:

Mountain Rose Herbs.com, "Rose Hips and Powder Profile" http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/learn/rosehips.php

Pubmed.gov. "Rose hip exerts anti-diabetic effects via a mechanism involving down-regulation of the hepatic lipogenic program," U. Anderson, et al. American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism, January 2011; 300(1): E111-21. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20959531

Biomedcentral.com. "Rose hip and its constituent galactolipids confer cartilage protection by modulating cytokine, and chemokine. "by Joseph Schwager, et.al.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/11/105

About the author:
This article is provided courtesy of Donna Earnest Pravel, owner and senior copy editor of Heart of Texas Copywriting Solutions.com. Get free weekly tips on natural healing and herbs by visiting her blog, Bluebonnet Natural Healing Therapy.

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