liver

New hope for liver disease: curcumin in tumeric spice fights liver damage and cirrhosis

Tuesday, September 28, 2010 by: S. L. Baker, features writer
Tags: curcumin, cirrhosis, health news

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 now clearly a government cover-up: All evidence contradicts official story
White House admits staging fake vaccination operation to gather DNA from the public
Irrefutable proof we are all being sprayed with poison: 571 tons of toxic lead 'chemtrailed' into America's skies every year
EXCLUSIVE: Natural News tests flu vaccine for heavy metals, finds 25,000 times higher mercury level than EPA limit for water
Russia taking McDonald's to court, threatens countrywide shutdown
Truvia sweetener a powerful pesticide; scientists shocked as fruit flies die in less than a week from eating GMO-derived erythritol
Why does the CDC own a patent on Ebola 'invention?'
Senator who attacked Doctor Oz over dietary supplements received over $146,000 in campaign contributions from Big Pharma mega-retailer and Monsanto
Global warming data FAKED by government to fit climate change fictions
HOAX confirmed: Michelle Obama 'GMOs for children' campaign a parody of modern agricultural politics
Oregon man serving prison sentence for collecting rainwater on his own property
U.S. treating meat with ammonia, bleach and antibiotics to kill the '24-hour sickness'
Ebola outbreak may already be uncontrollable; Monsanto invests in Ebola treatment drug company as pandemic spreads
Ben and Jerry's switches to non-GMO, Fair Trade ice cream ingredients
Diet soda, aspartame linked to premature deaths in women
Elliot Rodger, like nearly all young killers, was taking psychiatric drugs (Xanax)
Harvard research links fluoridated water to ADHD, mental disorders
Right to farm being stripped from Americans: Michigan to criminalize small family farms with chickens, goats, honey bees and more
Delicious
(NaturalNews) For countless centuries, turmeric has been used not only as a spice but as a healing aid in traditional Asian medicine. For example, historically it has been consumed to help gastrointestinal problems, arthritic pain, and a lack of energy. And in recent years, scientists have documented that tumeric and the natural compound it contains called curcumin may protect and heal due to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer properties.

In fact, as NaturalNews previously reported, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that curcumin, when combined with piperine (a component of black pepper), could play an important role in preventing and even treating breast cancer (http://www.naturalnews.com/027831_turmeric_p...). Now a new study published in the gastroenterology and hepatology journal Gut suggests curcumin could be a treatment for yet another serious health problem -- liver damage and cirrhosis.

"Chronic cholangiopathies (bile duct diseases) have limited therapeutic options and represent an important indication for liver transplantation. Curcumin, the yellow pigment of the spice turmeric, has pleiotropic (multiple effect) actions and attenuates hepatic damage in animal models of chemically-induced liver injury," the authors of the study, scientists in the division of gastroenterology and heptology at Medical University Graz in Austria, wrote.

So what causes bile duct problems? Genetic predispositions, injury, infections, and drinking alcohol to excess are all possible causes. The reason bile duct diseases are so dangerous -- and sometimes fatal -- is that when the liver's bile ducts swell they can scar and become irreversibly blocked. This causes serious liver damage to develop, leading to fatal cirrhosis.

Bottom line: bile duct diseases are life threatening and mainstream medicine has come up with few ways to help other than liver transplants. However, there's now tantalizing evidence that curcumin may help heal livers naturally.

For their study, the Austrian research team gave curcumin to lab mice who had chemically induced liver injuries. After consuming diets supplemented with curcumin for four to eight weeks, the rodents' liver damage was dramatically lessened. What's more, the addition of the spice component to the animals' food improved a serious liver condition known as sclerosing cholangitis, an autoimmune disorder.

In their paper, the researchers theorized that curcumin has multiple beneficial effects on liver health. For instance, they noted that the spice component blocked signal pathways necessary for inflammation to occur -- and that, in turn, slowed the progress of scarring which leads to reduced bile duct blockage and damage to liver cells.

Editor's note: NaturalNews is opposed to the use of animals in medical experiments that expose them to harm. We present these findings in protest of the way in which they were acquired.

For more information:
http://gut.bmj.com/content/59/4/521.abstract
http://www.naturalnews.com/curcumin.html

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.