cancer

New Study Finds Multivitamins and Calcium Slash Breast Cancer Risks

Monday, May 10, 2010 by: Tony Isaacs
Tags: breast cancer, multivitamins, health news

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(NaturalNews) A new study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's annual meeting has found that women who take multivitamins and calcium drastically reduce their odds of getting breast cancer. The study, conducted at the Ponce School of Medicine in Puerto Rico, found that women who routinely took multivitamins reduced their risk of developing breast cancer by almost 30 percent. Women who took nutritional supplements and calcium fared even better - reducing their risk by 40 plus percent.

Lead author PhD Jaime Matta and his colleagues from the Ponce School of Medicine in Puerto Rico found nutrient supplementation was linked to positive results when taken over an extended period.

"It is not an immediate effect" said Matta. "However, we did see a long-term effect in terms of breast cancer reduction".

The study compared the lifestyle habits of 268 breast cancer sufferers to those of 457 healthy women. Matta concluded that vitamin supplements may help subjugate cancer risk by enhancing DNA repair capacity.

Ironically, the study coincides with another study that is receiving widespread attention. That study conducted by Sweden's Karolinska Institute and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported that women who take multivitamins have a 20% increase in the risks of getting breast cancer.

Many find that the idea that adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals could somehow be unhealthy is absurd. Not surprisingly, criticism of the study has been immediate. However, one may have to go far down the mainstream reports to find any criticisms or doubts, if at all.

Professor John Boyages, director of the Westmead Breast Cancer Institute and spokesman for the National Breast Cancer Foundation, said he "wouldn't put any weight" on the study, as there were "many complicated risk factors involved in breast cancer."

Likewise, the Australia Complementary Healthcare Council cautioned consumers to "not panic" at the findings. It also cited "concerns over limitations to the study", such as its reliance on self-administered questionnaires and failure to look at the bioactivity of multivitamin ingredients.

No mention was made in the study of whether the health habits of the women who took the vitamins were compared to those who didn't take vitamins. Neither was there any mention of what kind of multivitamins the women took. Too many people think that they can offset unhealthy diets and lifestyles by popping a daily vitamin pill. In addition, over 95% of such supplements consist of ground up rocks, petroleum by-products and coal-tar derivatives.

Virtually every study which has returned negative results about vitamins or minerals has used the inferior and unnatural forms, instead of the forms found in nature. In addition, virtually all such studies fail to take into account the fact that nature works synergistically.

Isolating individual vitamins and minerals or other nutrients and adding them to an overall unhealthy diet might be compared to putting a hasty patch on a leaky roof on a building with a crumbling foundation. You might get some relief, but when a bad storm (disease) comes along, you may be ill prepared to keep the storm at bay.

Mainstream medical science makes the same mistakes when it tries to synthesize vitamins and compounds found in nature, or else uniquely isolate them. Doing so does not produce the natural molecule with supporting compounds or the whole vitamin profile found in nature. It does, however, produce something that can be patented and profited from. It also produces something that the body does not recognize as natural and which is liable to have side effects over 95% of the time.

It isn't rocket science. Sadly, it is medical science.

Sources included:

http://www.personalliberty.com/news/study-mu...
http://medicineworld.org/stories/lead/4-2010...
http://www.wddty.com/vitamins-reduce-the-ris...
http://www.news.com.au/national/multivitamin...

About the author

Tony Isaacs, is a natural health author, advocate and researcher who hosts The Best Years in Life website for those who wish to avoid prescription drugs and mainstream managed illness and live longer, healthier and happier lives naturally. Mr. Isaacs is the author of books and articles about natural health, longevity and beating cancer including "Cancer's Natural Enemy" and is working on a major book project due to be published later this year. He is also a contributing author for the worldwide advocacy group "S.A N.E.Vax. Inc" which endeavors to uncover the truth about HPV vaccine dangers.
Mr. Isaacs is currently residing in scenic East Texas and frequently commutes to the even more scenic Texas hill country near Austin and San Antonio to give lectures and health seminars. He also hosts the CureZone "Ask Tony Isaacs - featuring Luella May" forum as well as the Yahoo Health Group "Oleander Soup" and he serves as a consultant to the "Utopia Silver Supplement Company".

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