report

Ancient Greek artifact is actually a 2,000-year-old astronomical computer, report scientists

Thursday, November 30, 2006 by: Ben Kage
Tags: astronomy, ancient civilizations, health news

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
CDC issues flu vaccine apology: this year's vaccine doesn't work!
Biologist explains how marijuana causes tumor cells to commit suicide
Depopulation test run? 75% of children who received vaccines in Mexican town now dead or hospitalized
BAM! Chipotle goes 100% non-GMO; flatly rejecting the biotech industry and its toxic food ingredients
Companies begin planting microchips under employees' skin
U2's Bono partners with Monsanto to destroy African agriculture with GMOs
NJ cops bust teenagers shoveling snow without a permit
Russia throws down the gauntlet: energy supply to Europe cut off; petrodollar abandoned as currency war escalates
McDonald's in global profit free fall as people everywhere increasingly reject chemically-altered toxic fast food
Chemotherapy kills cancer patients faster than no treatment at all
Why flu shots are the greatest medical fraud in history
600 strains of an aerosolized thought control vaccine already tested on humans; deployed via air, food and water
Italian court rules mercury and aluminum in vaccines cause autism: US media continues total blackout of medical truth
Flu vaccine kills 13 in Italy; death toll rises
The 21 curious questions we're never allowed to ask about vaccines
Vicious attack on Dr. Oz actually waged by biotech mafia; plot to destroy Oz launched after episode on glyphosate toxicity went viral
Orthorexia Nervosa - New mental disorder aimed at people who insist on eating a clean diet
Whooping cough outbreak at Massachusetts high school affected only vaccinated students

Delicious
(NaturalNews) At the turn of the last century, an astronomical instrument was rescued from a Roman shipwreck, and now scientists have concluded it is an ancient computer -- at least 1,000 years ahead of its time -- used to determine the position of heavenly bodies.

Greek sponge divers recovered the 82 separate pieces of the bronze and wood device in 1900, off the island of Antikythera. After it was recently examined with an advanced medical scanner, an international team of multidisciplinary scientists found that the complex system of gears, concentric wheels and pointers actually comprised a type of analogue computer. The system acted as a calendar, predicted lunar and solar eclipses, and tracked the movement of the sun, the planets, and even the moon's irregular orbit.

"Calendars were important to ancient societies for timing agricultural activity and fixing religious festivals," wrote the scientists in the journal Nature. "Eclipses and planetary motions were often interpreted as omens, while the calm regularity of the astronomical cycles must have been philosophically attractive in an uncertain and violent world."

The scientists made a picture of the device's working process, which has amazed many classical scholars.

"This device is just extraordinary, the only thing of its kind," said Professor Mike Edmunds of Cardiff University, a leading member of the team. "The design is beautiful, the astronomy is exactly right. The way the mechanics are designed just makes your jaw drop.

"Whoever has done this had done it extremely well. It does raise the question of what else were they making at the time. In terms of historic and scarcity value, I have to regard this mechanism as being more valuable than the Mona Lisa."

In Munich, Ludwig-Maximillian University astronomer Francois Charette compared the finding to discovering plans for a steam engine in Renaissance Italy.

The Roman shipwreck from which the device was recovered was thought to have been from around 65 B.C., but the instrument itself may be from as far back as 100 B.C. to 150 B.C. and possibly constructed by Hipparchos, a Greek astronomer who lived on the island of Rhodes around that time. Hipparchos was suggested because he was the first person to track the irregular orbit of the moon, just as the device does.

The device has three dials. The front dial shows the position of the sun and the moon in the zodiac and the corresponding 365-day calendar, and the dial could be adjusted for leap years. The back dials were used to track the long-term lunar cycle. They were even able to track the 19-year period when the same phase of the moon returns on the same date of the year -- known as the Metonic cycle -- and the 76-year Callippic cycle, in which the moon returns to the same position in the sky relative to its monthly lunar phase and the zodiac.

###

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.