cancer

Consumer alert: "Pink" products are marketing gimmicks that do nothing to prevent or cure breast cancer, health author says

Friday, October 06, 2006 by: Jessica Fraser
Tags: breast cancer, cancer industry, medical myths

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(NaturalNews) October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month, and consumers across the country are rushing to buy pink merchandise that boasts "Proceeds benefit breast cancer awareness initiatives," but consumer advocates claim purchasing such products does nothing to cure or prevent breast cancer.

Pink merchandise in support of breast cancer research has been around for years, but this year bigger brands and more expensive products have joined the "pink" craze, including Kitchen Aid, which offers a pink mixer for around $300, and Wilson, which offers pink-accented golf clubs. Companies such as BMW and New Balance are also associating products and services with pink breast cancer awareness ribbons.

However, natural health advocate Mike Adams, author of "The Seven Laws of Nutrition," says vast numbers of companies are jumping on the "pink" bandwagon simply to sell more products. Adams says few consumers question where their money goes when they buy pink products to support breast cancer research.

"How does buying pink merchandise help women with breast cancer? The answer is that the money goes to pharmaceutical company-sponsored breast cancer front groups that are actively engaged in the suppression of breast cancer prevention information," Adams claims. "They intentionally discredit existing breast cancer treatments and cures like vitamin D and sunlight therapy in order to trick consumers into thinking a cure doesn't yet exist."

Adams says pharmaceutical companies have tricked consumers into believing that they are making a statement about themselves by purchasing pink products. "While they think the statement is, 'I care about women's health,' what's really being stated is, 'I am easily fooled by marketing gimmicks,'" Adams said.

Peggy Johnson, former president of the Mid-Kansas Susan G. Komen chapter, advises consumers to exercise discretion when shopping for pink products. "If it doesn't say who it's going to or how much is being donated, don't buy it," Johnson said.

Adams says breast cancer cannot be cured by buying pink-colored products, because the pharmaceutical research those purchases fund won't produce a cure. "Cancer can only be prevented and cured through nutrition, genuine disease prevention and embracing those natural therapies that really work, such as sunlight, rainforest herbs, juice detox programs, raw foods and regular exercise," Adams said.

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