health

Study shows strong link between obesity and depression (press release)

Wednesday, September 06, 2006 by: NaturalNews
Tags: health news, Natural News, nutrition

eTrust Pro Certified

Most Viewed Articles
Popular on Facebook
CDC issues flu vaccine apology: this year's vaccine doesn't work!
Biologist explains how marijuana causes tumor cells to commit suicide
Depopulation test run? 75% of children who received vaccines in Mexican town now dead or hospitalized
BAM! Chipotle goes 100% non-GMO; flatly rejecting the biotech industry and its toxic food ingredients
Companies begin planting microchips under employees' skin
U2's Bono partners with Monsanto to destroy African agriculture with GMOs
NJ cops bust teenagers shoveling snow without a permit
Russia throws down the gauntlet: energy supply to Europe cut off; petrodollar abandoned as currency war escalates
McDonald's in global profit free fall as people everywhere increasingly reject chemically-altered toxic fast food
Chemotherapy kills cancer patients faster than no treatment at all
Why flu shots are the greatest medical fraud in history
600 strains of an aerosolized thought control vaccine already tested on humans; deployed via air, food and water
Flu vaccine kills 13 in Italy; death toll rises
Italian court rules mercury and aluminum in vaccines cause autism: US media continues total blackout of medical truth
The 21 curious questions we're never allowed to ask about vaccines
Vicious attack on Dr. Oz actually waged by biotech mafia; plot to destroy Oz launched after episode on glyphosate toxicity went viral
Orthorexia Nervosa - New mental disorder aimed at people who insist on eating a clean diet
Whooping cough outbreak at Massachusetts high school affected only vaccinated students

Delicious
There is a strong link between obesity and mood and anxiety disorders, especially among Caucasian Americans and those with more education and higher income, according to an analysis conducted by researchers from Group Health Center for Health Studies.

The study, published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, found that an obese person is about 25 percent more likely than a non-obese person to have a mood or anxiety disorder, such as depression. It also indicated that among Caucasian Americans and more educated people who are obese, that likelihood may be as high as 44 percent.

While the study did not show whether obesity leads to depression or vice versa, "it's almost certain that the association works in both directions," said Greg Simon, MD, MPH, a Group Health psychiatrist and the lead author of the study.

The researchers also found a negative association between obesity and substance abuse. That is, an obese person is 25 percent less likely than a non-obese person to have had a substance abuse disorder sometime in their lives.

"Understanding the connection between obesity and depression is an important public health issue because both of these conditions are so common and have a significant impact on our health care systems," Dr. Simon explained.

He pointed to the evidence that an average American has a 30 percent chance of being obese. This study shows that when a person is depressed, the odds of also becoming obese are as high as 40 percent.

About 20 percent of Americans are diagnosed sometime in their lives with depression. "Among those who are obese, that likelihood of depression jumps to 28 percent," said Dr. Simon.

The study is based on an in-person survey that the researchers from Harvard Medical School conducted among a nationally representative sample of 9,125 adult men and women. Obesity is defined in the study as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more.

While previous studies have shown a connection between obesity and depression, this is the largest and most representative study of the two problems in U.S. population. Also, this study included a much more careful assessment of mental health problems than earlier research, according to Dr. Simon.

Unlike many previous studies that show a link between obesity and depression among women only, this study revealed a strong link in both genders. There were significant differences among social and cultural groups. In groups where obesity is more common--that is, among non-white and less educated groups--there is less depression among the people who are obese. But in groups where there is less obesity, it is accompanied by more depression.

This may indicate that stigma accounts for some of the relationship between obesity and depression, said Dr. Simon. "Perhaps in groups where obesity is less socially normative, it's less acceptable and that's why there's a greater association with depression," he suggested. "But in groups where it is less stigmatized, obesity doesn't seem to be as depressing."

Research currently underway Group Health may lead to a better understanding of the link between body weight and mental health, and how these problems might be moderated.

Dr. Simon and his team are now conducting studies to address questions such as: Do depressed people have more difficulty increasing physically activity? Are their diets different than the diets of non-depressed people? Are depressed people less likely to be successful with structured weight-loss programs? Can weight-loss programs designed specifically for depressed people make a difference?

Simon's article was co-authored by Michael Von Korff, ScD, Kathleen Saunders, JD, and Diana Miglioretti, PhD, of Group Health Center for Health Studies; Paul K. Crane, MD, and Gerald van Belle, PhD, of the University of Washington; and Ronald C. Kessler, PhD, of Harvard Medical School.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, with additional support from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the John W. Alden Trust, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Pfizer Foundation, the U.S. Public Health Service, the Pan American Health Organization, Eli Lilly and Company, and GlaxoSmithKline.

About Group Health and its Center for Health Studies About Founded in 1947, Group Health is a consumer-governed, nonprofit health care system that coordinates care and coverage. Based in Seattle, Group Health and its subsidiary health carriers, Group Health Options, Inc. and KPS Health Plans, serve more than 574,000 members in Washington and Idaho. Group Health Center for Health Studies conducts research related to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of major health problems. It is funded primarily through government and private research grants. Please visit the virtual newsroom on our Web site, www.ghc.org under "Newsroom."

Contact: Joan DeClaire declaire.j@ghc.org 206-287-2653 Group Health Cooperative Center for Health Studies

Join over four million monthly readers. Your privacy is protected. Unsubscribe at any time.
comments powered by Disqus
Take Action: Support NaturalNews.com by linking back to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite NaturalNews.com with clickable link.

Follow Natural News on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest

Colloidal Silver

Advertise with NaturalNews...

Support NaturalNews Sponsors:

Advertise with NaturalNews...

GET SHOW DETAILS
+ a FREE GIFT

Sign up for the FREE Natural News Email Newsletter

Receive breaking news on GMOs, vaccines, fluoride, radiation protection, natural cures, food safety alerts and interviews with the world's top experts on natural health and more.

Join over 7 million monthly readers of NaturalNews.com, the internet's No. 1 natural health news site. (Source: Alexa.com)

Your email address *

Please enter the code you see above*

No Thanks

Already have it and love it!

Natural News supports and helps fund these organizations:

* Required. Once you click submit, we will send you an email asking you to confirm your free registration. Your privacy is assured and your information is kept confidential. You may unsubscribe at anytime.